Alessandra and Stephen DiCicco bought their rowhouse right after they were married in 2013. They were taken in immediately by one South Philadelphia street in particular.

“We loved Marvine Street,” she said. “It’s tree-lined, quiet, and friendly.”

And a three-bedroom home they found there had features the couple loved.

“The home had such charming qualities,” DiCicco said. “Exposed brick, exposed ductwork, and a vintage, claw-foot tub.”

The living room, with exposed brick.
Courtesy of Compass
The living room, with exposed brick.

The 1,080-square-foot property was built in 1960, and she said it did not require much work when they moved in. This gave the couple time to add personal touches, including a Pinterest-inspired laundry room in the finished basement.

One project they did undertake was upgrading the outdoor space behind the home, which is just a few blocks north of Citizens Bank Park.

“We put up the cedar fence for a tranquil, private backyard,” she said. “We love sitting outside in the evenings, listening to the Phillies’ home-run bell ding.”

DiCicco and her husband have enjoyed their South Philadelphia neighborhood for more than its proximity to baseball, but they do appreciate that the Sports Complex Special Services District keeps the streets clean and maintains Marconi Plaza each spring.

The exterior of the rowhouse on Marvine Street, described by the owners as a quiet, tree-lined street.
Courtesy of Compass
The exterior of the rowhouse on Marvine Street, described by the owners as a quiet, tree-lined street.

“We have loved to see the neighborhood bloom over the past six years. It’s almost as far south as South Philly gets and certainly a hidden gem,” she said.

A work opportunity recently led the couple to list the home for sale.

“We are sad to be leaving the city and the community of friends and activities we have built in the neighborhood,” she said.

She expects new owners to find joy in some of the things she and her husband have loved about living in the home.

“I think buyers will be happy to find a quiet, clean, tree-lined street that is close to the Broad Street Line,” she said. “It takes 17 minutes from the time you leave the house to exiting the subway at City Hall Station.”

The house is listed with Kristin McFeely at Compass for $325,000.

The kitchen and dining area of the South Philly rowhouse.
Courtesy of Compass
The kitchen and dining area of the South Philly rowhouse.