The Kansas City Chiefs are one of six NFL teams that are allowing limited fans to attend games. While there was a lot of cheering during the game, the home fans booed their own players during a moment of unity with the Houston Texans before kickoff.

Alex Okafor of the Chiefs was the lone player who knelt during the national anthem, and the Texans stayed in the locker room.

For fans that were so excited about the NFL’s return that they attended a game with just 15,895 people, the boos were confusing to players. The contrast between the cheering during the 60 minutes of play and the disapproval of showing unity before the game shows why some players believe that fans view them solely as entertainers.

“The moment of unity I personally thought was good. The booing was unfortunate in that moment,” Texans defensive end J.J. Watt said after the game. “I don’t fully understand that. There was no flag involved, there was nothing involved with that besides two teams coming together to show unity.”

The Chiefs may have had the best group of offensive weapons in the NFL last season, but that core got even stronger with the addition of rookie running back Clyde Edwards-Helaire, and he wasted no time proving it. Edwards-Helaire showed off his well-anticipated juke move on his first career touchdown. He finished with 25 carries for 138 yards and a touchdown.

On a day where Travis Kelce, Sammy Watkins and Tyreek Hill all caught touchdown passes from Super Bowl MVP Patrick Mahomes, it was Edwards-Helaire who seemed to wow spectators the most.

There’s no replacing DeAndre Hopkins

The Texans have a superstar quarterback of their own, but his supporting cast wasn’t as good. Houston traded DeAndre Hopkins this past offseason, and now the team is searching for a No. 1 receiver and many more things to accommodate Watson.

A cryptic tweet from Hopkins sure made it seem like he isn’t missing his old team.

David Johnson leads Texans offense in debut

Running back David Johnson, who was acquired by the Texans in the Hopkins trade, was one of the NFL’s best running backs three seasons ago, but his health and lack of production led to new beginnings in Houston. So far, it looks like he’s found a nice new home.

Andy Reid’s foggy shield was the only thing that could stop him

At times, it looked like Andy Reid couldn’t even see his play call sheet. The 62-year old Chiefs head coach wore a shield on his face instead of a mask. The shield fogged up throughout the game, and Reid even lifted it a little bit at times to see better. It’ll be interesting to see if he continues to use it. If it was troublesome on a warm September night, imagine the obscured vision he’d have when it’s pouring down rain or cold game in December.

“I didn’t do very good with that thing," Reid said after the game. "Listen, it will be better the next time. I appreciate you asking that, it was a bit of a mess.”