Latest Stories
Opinion

Clarity is key in Trump impeachment proceedings. That’s why the ellipsis must die. | The Angry Grammarian

The testimony transcripts released last week reveal that the Ukraine call’s ellipses created only confusion—and perhaps deliberate deception.

Opinion

‘Lynching’ is a word best confined to the trash heap of history | The Angry Grammarian

Collectively dumping the misuse of the most traumatic words in our country’s history is the kind of mob mentality we can all get behind.

Opinion

The maddeningly inconsistent answer to a pressing Trump quid pro quo question | The Angry Grammarian

When you pluralize quid pro quo, should you do it with an apostrophe?

Opinion

Adam Schiff is a grammatical hero when it comes to Trump’s whistle-blower | The Angry Grammarian

Two weeks ago, Merriam-Webster added the third-person singular pronoun they to the dictionary. Just in time for the impeachment inquiry!

Opinion

A slur as a verb? N.J. lawmakers using anti-Semitic speech are wrong for many reasons | The Angry Grammarian

By itself, Jew is a standard noun. But when changed to a verb, it’s laden with millennia of offensive stereotypes.

Opinion

Don’t miss the ‘comma sexting’ in Hamilton | Angry Grammarian

Plus other writing advice hidden in the Tony Award-winning musical currently playing at the Forrest Theatre.

Opinion

Ohio State’s ludicrous application to trademark the word ‘the’ | The Angry Grammarian

However silly the trademark may seem, let's take a moment to appreciate "the" and other articles.

Opinion

Does labeling tragedies as ‘terrorism’ empower the culprits or comfort the victims? | The Angry Grammarian

There are thousands of -ists and even more -isms, and these words are double-edged swords. On the one hand, labeling a group — be they nationalists, white supremacists, racists — gives it legitimacy and power. An identifiable group can more easily recruit adherents and spread hate.

Opinion

Why are slurs allowed in some online Scrabble games? | The Angry Grammarian

A word-loving reader recently inquired why, when playing Scrabble on Facebook, her opponent was able to play the word JEWED — a highly offensive term for bargaining. The word doesn’t appear in her published Scrabble dictionary, and yet it was permitted by the computer.

Opinion

End a sentence with a preposition? Good reasons are easy to come by | The Angry Grammarian

Yes, I love grammar. But some traditional grammar rules are really stupid.