School is out, but really, aside from not dragging your fifth grader into another Zoom math class, have things really changed? We’re all still home, and some of us — the adults — still have to work, or look for work. Joy.

Luckily, some of our favorite livestreams aren’t taking summer vacation either. They’re teaching U.S. history about Flag Day and Juneteenth, and giving kids something to do outside that’s not pelting each other with water balloons. (Thank you, Academy of Natural Sciences!) They’re also keeping them moving and singing and generally jamming, Philly style, with Jams for Junior Jawns, and — for those teens whose fingers are just itching to get themselves into art school one day — offering virtual access to a bilingual manga class.

Flag Day at the Betsy Ross House

Recorded Sunday, and now on the Betsy Ross House Facebook (school age and up)

On Sunday, June 14, Flag Day, the Betsy Ross House had three special programs on Facebook. .
Photo by M. Kennedy for Historic Philadelphia Inc.
On Sunday, June 14, Flag Day, the Betsy Ross House had three special programs on Facebook. .

At the Betsy Ross House, Flag Day is Christmas day. The wee Old City birthplace of the star-spangled banner pulled out all the stops Sunday — online, this year — with a trio of brief videos where an actor playing Ross tells the story of the flag’s creation and explains the evolution of its symbols. An actor playing Bishop Richard Allen, founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church and Revolutionary War soldier, explains what the flag may have meant to him, a formerly enslaved African American man, in the late 18th century.

Ask the Scientists

3-3:30 p.m. Tuesdays, register online at ansp.org/programs-and-events (ages 7-11)

A great blue heron at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge. A ranger from the refuge will join the Academy of Natural Sciences Tuesday afternoon on Zoom to talk with kids about the natural world in their own backyards.
MICHAEL BRYANT / Staff Photographer
A great blue heron at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge. A ranger from the refuge will join the Academy of Natural Sciences Tuesday afternoon on Zoom to talk with kids about the natural world in their own backyards.

The Academy of Natural Sciences debuts its virtual classroom — class-Zoom? — this week, encouraging kids to get off their iPads and go outside — right after class-Zoom, that is. For session number one, entomologist Tanya Dapkey and John Heinz park ranger Wingyi Kung will reveal the beauty of backyard bugs, birds, plants, deer, and such, then answer questions about them. Next Tuesday, June 23, botanist Jordan Teisher and entomologist Greg Cowper will demo how to turn outside finds into collections. On Tuesday, June 30, wetland ecologist Beth Watson and ichthyologist (fish scientist) Mariangeles Acre H. will talk about how a global pandemic could affect global biodiversity.

Jams for Junior Jawns

10-10:25 a.m. Fridays, live (and then recorded) on Instagram @juniorjawns (ages 4—6)

At 10 a.m. on Fridays, Philadelphia songwriter and musician M'Balia Singley (right) presents "Jam for Junior Jawns" on Instagram. The preschool program consists of original and classic songs for singing along, shoutouts to viewers, and appearances by Donut de la Sprinkles, Singley's 12-year-old (left).
Photo courtesy of M'Balia Singley/Jams for Junior Jawns
At 10 a.m. on Fridays, Philadelphia songwriter and musician M'Balia Singley (right) presents "Jam for Junior Jawns" on Instagram. The preschool program consists of original and classic songs for singing along, shoutouts to viewers, and appearances by Donut de la Sprinkles, Singley's 12-year-old (left).

Songwriter and musician M’Balia Singley wouldn’t let a little thing like a global pandemic stop her work. With the Kimmel Center, schools, and such closed, she’s turned her home into a stage, turned her original songs — “My Friends are Always in my Heart,” “Peace, Adios, I Love You” — into internet sensations, and made her Instagram the best spot for preschoolers to sing, sway, receive a birthday shoutout, and shake their sillies out — all in less than a half hour. Bandmates Jimmy Coleman (drums) and Patrick Hughes (trumpet) plan to join in virtually in the coming weeks. Meanwhile, Singley’s 12-year-old, Adelia, has stepped up, wearing last year’s Halloween costume and appearing as Donut de la Sprinkles — a rising star if ever there were one.

Juneteenth Storytime

Sabrya Banks, 13, of Gloucester County, N.J., in last year's Juneteenth Parade in Philadelphia.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Sabrya Banks, 13, of Gloucester County, N.J., in last year's Juneteenth Parade in Philadelphia.

In a year when in-person Juneteenth parades and festivals might have, at long last, drawn crowds, Mighty Writers South director Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow gives the all-American holiday its due with a thoughtful, interactive hour. She’ll read from Floyd Cooper’s picture book, Juneteenth for Mazie, share songs and dances, and teach future kindergartners-through-rising third graders to compose freedom poetry.

Manga Academy 1.0

Register through Friday at tallerpr.org/yap-manga-academy-1-0. Classes are 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Wednesdays & Thursdays, June 24–July 16 (ages 15—22, free to members, $50 for new students to cover materials)

Art student Andres Vasquez at Taller Puertorriqueno last March. The arts center is offering online manga classes this summer for students ages 15-22.
MARGO REED / Staff Photographer
Art student Andres Vasquez at Taller Puertorriqueno last March. The arts center is offering online manga classes this summer for students ages 15-22.

Art classes at Taller Puertorriqueño have always been “entirely based on the space,” says Youth Artist Program (YAP) director Daniel de Jesús. For its students, the Fairhill arts and cultural center is also a nurturing hangout. So de Jesús has been researching how to make the digital space feel as homey as possible. Manga Academy 1.0, inspired by his teenage students’ love for Japanese comics, offers three hours twice a week of art history, meditation, instruction, a plan to publish finished work in an anthology — and the materials to make it happen.