5:21 PM - June 27, 2020
5:21 PM - June 27, 2020

Photos: Protests continue across Philadelphia for another weekend

5:06 PM - June 27, 2020
5:06 PM - June 27, 2020

Mississippi moves to strip Confederate image from its flag

Don Hartness of Ellisville, walks around the Capitol carrying the current Mississippi state flag and the American flag, Saturday, June 27, 2020, in Jackson, Miss.
Rogelio V. Solis / AP
Don Hartness of Ellisville, walks around the Capitol carrying the current Mississippi state flag and the American flag, Saturday, June 27, 2020, in Jackson, Miss.

JACKSON, Miss. — Spectators at the Mississippi Capitol broke into applause Saturday as lawmakers took the first steps toward erasing the Confederate battle emblem from the state flag, a symbol that has come under intensifying criticism in recent weeks amid nationwide protests against racial injustice.

“The eyes of the state, the nation and indeed the world are on this House,” the second-ranking officer in the Mississippi House, Jason White, told his colleagues.

The House voted by more than the required two-thirds majority to suspend legislative deadlines and file a bill to change the flag. The Senate was expect to vote on the suspension later Saturday. That would allow debate on a bill as soon as Sunday.

— Associated Press

4:16 PM - June 27, 2020
4:16 PM - June 27, 2020

Dozens gather at Hahnemann for ‘Care Not Cops’ protest

Protesters gather behind the former Hahnemann University Hospital during the "Care Not Cops" rally in Philadelphia on Saturday, June 27, 2020. The rally, organized by health care and other professionals, called for abolishing police and prison systems and redirecting their funding toward other resources.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Protesters gather behind the former Hahnemann University Hospital during the "Care Not Cops" rally in Philadelphia on Saturday, June 27, 2020. The rally, organized by health care and other professionals, called for abolishing police and prison systems and redirecting their funding toward other resources.

Dozens set off from City Hall for a “Care Not Cops” protest Saturday to rally against diminishing health care funds in Philadelphia as well as the closure of Hahnemann University Hospital in September.

“I see the way that these systems have in every way disproportionately supported wealthy, white, privileged patients,” said Alice, a third-year medical student at Jefferson University who wore scrubs and her white coat. She declined to give her last name over concerns of facing professional ramifications for being at the protest. “They serve to hold up systems of institutional racism.”

Protesters created their own blockades using items at the back of now-empty Hahnemann on Broad Street. Some in black clothing and black helmets found metal carts and wooden pallets and pushed them together into the street to form a V-shaped blockade that physically divided themselves from the police following the protest.

Demonstrators set up a small tent and handed out beverages while chanting slogans like “No justice, no peace.”

Protesters quickly left the hospital after Philadelphia police in black tactical gear showed up and headed toward them. The crowd veered from Broad Street and turned into a narrow residential alley.

”Everyone split up,” a protester called, minutes before the rally ended near the Parkway Free Library of Philadelphia.

— Katie Park

3:34 PM - June 27, 2020
3:34 PM - June 27, 2020

‘Stripper strike’ protests discrimination, calls for safer working conditions

3:10 PM - June 27, 2020
3:10 PM - June 27, 2020

Musicians rally at the PMA steps in Philly’s clarion call for justice

2:54 PM - June 27, 2020
2:54 PM - June 27, 2020

Protesters gather at Penn’s Landing

At Penn’s Landing, a few vendors had tables set up as a DJ played music. A woman holding a “Black Trans Lives Matter” sign posed for a photo while protesters took a break on the steps. One blew bubbles, another relaxed under the shade of a rainbow umbrella.

James Ruiz, 36, marched with his boyfriend on Saturday, carrying a poster with the names and likenesses of Black trans people who have been killed. He has been participating in the city’s protests for weeks, and said he was happy to march Saturday but wished more people had shown up.

“It’s important to keep up the momentum,” he said. “It’s important to be part of the movement.” Ruiz, who is Mexican, said he attended “to be an ally and to support Black queer trans lives.”

— Justine McDaniel

2:30 PM - June 27, 2020
2:30 PM - June 27, 2020

Crowd marches east along Market Street

A crowd of more than 100 stopped at 9th and Market Streets as an organizer spoke over a megaphone, paying tribute in part to the lives of Tony McDade and Nina Pop.

The group marched silently east along Market Street, with their fists held up. People carried signs that read, “Black Lives Matter,” “Abolish the Cops,” and “White Queers for Black Lives.”

Clapping and chanting, demonstrators marched toward Penn’s Landing around 2:30 p.m. One woman handed out cold drinks and snacks to fellow protesters. People wore or carried rainbow-colored flags and signs.

Vanessa Williams, 43, was marching with her daughters, 20 and 10. Her older daughter had urged the family to come to the rally, and Williams, who is Black, said it was an important experience for her children to have.

“I’m a supporter of Black Lives Matter and increasingly aware of the issues that affect the Black LGBTQ community,” she said.

— Justine McDaniel

1:46 PM - June 27, 2020
1:46 PM - June 27, 2020

Questlove: ‘This will result in a more just and peaceful existence’

Philly’s Questlove believes positive change from the past month of demonstrations is coming.

The Roots musician joined NBC10′s Jacqueline London in an interview Friday ahead of this year’s Roots Picnic, to be held Saturday night virtually because of the coronavirus.

“I think this is a very necessary action, and it’s going to be uncomfortable and this is the definition of revolution,” he told the station when asked his thoughts on recent protests in Philadelphia, “but I also have faith that this will result in a more just and peaceful existence, once people really hear each other.”

Questlove said he recently drove along 52nd Street “to see what had happened.” Outrage and vandalism that erupted in Center City over George Floyd’s death spilled into the area earlier this month, where about 150 people took to the streets.

“It’s a shame that sometimes you have to go a drastic place to make people listen to you, and understand and have empathy, but I have faith in times like these,” he said.

Saturday’s Roots Picnic will be livestreamed on YouTube at 8 p.m. Saturday.

— Patricia Madej

12:50 PM - June 27, 2020
12:50 PM - June 27, 2020

Princeton strips Woodrow Wilson’s name from school, citing his racist past

The Woodrow Wilson School's Robertson Hall at Princeton University. Some students in 2015 demanded that Wilson's name be stripped from the school, given his racist views. The university retained the name but promised better efforts on diversity.
Jose F. Moreno / Staff Photographer
The Woodrow Wilson School's Robertson Hall at Princeton University. Some students in 2015 demanded that Wilson's name be stripped from the school, given his racist views. The university retained the name but promised better efforts on diversity.

Princeton University Saturday announced it would strip the name of former U.S. President Woodrow Wilson from its school of public and international affairs and one of its residential colleges, following letters and calls from students and alumni.

“We have taken this extraordinary step because we believe that Wilson’s racist thinking and policies make him an inappropriate namesake for a school whose scholars, students, and alumni must be firmly committed to combatting the scourge of racism in all its forms,” the university said in a statement following a vote by the board of trustees on Friday.

An historic turning point, the decision follows years of controversy and protests by students at New Jersey’s Ivy League university, who decried Wilson’s place on campus, given his racist views and policies, including keeping Black students from enrolling at Princeton when he headed it.

— Sue Snyder

12:12 PM - June 27, 2020
12:12 PM - June 27, 2020

‘Art Thrives from Black Lives’ draws marchers to West Philadelphia

11:10 AM - June 27, 2020
11:10 AM - June 27, 2020

Rallies, demonstrations planned across Philadelphia Saturday

Jeff Bradshaw, a trombonist from Philadelphia, on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art this week. On Saturday, he'll bring together horn players in a musical call for justice, his second such rally in support of the global movement opposing racism and police brutality.
ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ / Staff Photographer
Jeff Bradshaw, a trombonist from Philadelphia, on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art this week. On Saturday, he'll bring together horn players in a musical call for justice, his second such rally in support of the global movement opposing racism and police brutality.

Rallies and demonstrations denouncing racial injustice continue across Philadelphia this weekend.

An “Art Thrives from Black Lives: An Artistic Rally” is slated until 3 p.m. in West Philadelphia, while “Another Week, Another Saturday in Historic Germantown: Shout-Out for Racial Justice” kicks off in Germantown at noon.

Events including “Bring Your Horn: Another Clarion Call For Justice,” “Black Queer Lives Matter – A Rally & Celebration,” and “Care Not Cops Rally” are scheduled in the Center City area later Saturday afternoon.

“We’re sick and tired of being sick and tired, and we, nurses, doctors, teachers, mental health professionals, unhoused folks, and many more, are marching for immediate abolition of the police and prisons, and the redirection of their resources, infrastructure and funding to us, so that we can take care of each other,” reads the “Cares Not Cops Rally” event description. “And if the city won’t give it to us, we’ll take it for ourselves!”

— Patricia Madej

10:18 AM - June 27, 2020
10:18 AM - June 27, 2020

National policing reform stalls in Congress despite public support during national trauma

Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.), joined by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., and other House Democrats spaced for social distancing, speaks during a news conference on the House East Front Steps on Capitol Hill Thursday ahead of the House vote on the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020.
Carolyn Kaster / AP
Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.), joined by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., and other House Democrats spaced for social distancing, speaks during a news conference on the House East Front Steps on Capitol Hill Thursday ahead of the House vote on the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020.

WASHINGTON — For a moment, Congress had a chance to act on a policing overhaul, mobilized by a national trauma and overwhelming public support. Those efforts have stalled now and seem unlikely to be revived in an election year.

It’s latest example of how partisanship and polarization on Capitol Hill have hamstrung Congress’ ability to meet the moment and respond meaningfully to public opinion.

Major changes in policing policy appear likely to join gun control and immigration as social issues where even with Americans’ overwhelming support, their elected representatives are unable or unwilling to go along, especially when President Donald Trump is indifferent or opposed.

— Associated Press

10:15 AM - June 27, 2020
10:15 AM - June 27, 2020

COVID-19 hasn’t surged in cities with big protests, but has in states that reopened early

Protester Iris Bowen raises her fist, along with with many other protesters gathered at the Art Museum steps, in remembrance of George Floyd, in Philadelphia on June 4.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Protester Iris Bowen raises her fist, along with with many other protesters gathered at the Art Museum steps, in remembrance of George Floyd, in Philadelphia on June 4.

The United States may be seeing the most compelling evidence yet that the best way to stop the coronavirus is also the most disruptive and difficult: Stay home and avoid other people.

At first glance, the evidence seems conflicting.

States in the South and West that reopened their economies early and with few precautions are now grappling with huge surges in daily case counts, hospitalizations, and deaths.

Yet Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and other cities across the country have not seen the sharp, sustained spikes that were expected after hundreds of thousands of people gathered for protests against police brutality. Daily demonstrations, some capped by riots, began about a week after George Floyd was killed by Minneapolis police on May 25. The maximum incubation period for COVID-19 — the time between getting infected and showing symptoms — is believed to be two weeks, so any fallout should be clear by now.

— Marie McCullough

10:00 AM - June 27, 2020
10:00 AM - June 27, 2020

Petition calls for PAFA to fire its CEO and make sweeping changes to ‘dismantle its structural racism’

Details on the front of the Gothic revival architecture of the Historic Landmark Building Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts at 118 N. Broad St.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Details on the front of the Gothic revival architecture of the Historic Landmark Building Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts at 118 N. Broad St.

More than 850 alumni and students of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, along with members of the greater arts community, have signed a petition calling for restructuring the leadership of the nation’s oldest museum and school of fine arts, starting with “the immediate termination” of CEO and president David Brigham.

The petition went up Thursday on the website changeatpafa.com. It denounces a June 12 memo to faculty and staff from Lisa R. Biagas, vice president of human resources, “reminding” them not to state their PAFA affiliation in petitions and protests supporting Black Lives Matter, as first reported by Billy Penn on June 19.

“As we all continue to participate in our democracy,” Biagas’ memo read, “I want to remind you that we do so as private, individual citizens, and that we do not represent ourselves by our PAFA affiliation or titles in these forums.”

— Ellen Gray

10:00 AM - June 27, 2020
10:00 AM - June 27, 2020

Temple says it will no longer give money to the Philadelphia Police Foundation

Temple University became the second area university this past week to withdraw funding from the Philadelphia Police Foundation amid concerns from students, faculty, and protesters about police brutality.

“In the past, Temple has provided a small amount of support to the Philadelphia Police Foundation through charitable donations,” president Richard M. Englert said in a two-paragraph statement. “Upon review and community input, we have decided that the university will no longer provide this support.”

Instead, Temple will spend the money on social justice programs at the school, he said. Temple declined to say how much money it gave annually to the foundation.

— Sue Snyder

10:00 AM - June 27, 2020
10:00 AM - June 27, 2020

Today’s front page

Philadelphia Inquirer front page, June 27, 2020.
Philadelphia Inquirer
Philadelphia Inquirer front page, June 27, 2020.