Cat cafe. On Aug. 1, Bucks County’s first cat-centric cafe, MeWow Café, opened in Doylestown. The new shop, at 3617 Old Easton Rd., offers a view of the “Kitty Corral," a glass-enclosed living area and playpen used by cats that have been rescued by the Bucks County SPCA and Kitty Junction, for customers to enjoy watching while sipping a caffeinated or non-caffeinated beverage. For $10 for an hour, or $6 for half an hour, customers can enter the corral and meet the on-display felines, all of whom are eligible for adoption. For more information, go to www.mewow.cafe.

The 10 members of Boy Scout Troop 98 who rose to Eagle Scout.
COURTESY OF BOY SCOUT TROOP 98
The 10 members of Boy Scout Troop 98 who rose to Eagle Scout.

Scouts honored. On Aug. 4, Boy Scout Troop 98 promoted 10 young men to the Scout’s highest rank: Eagle Scout. Each member of the Blue Bell-based troop completed individual service projects, the final requirement to earn their new title. One Scout built a fire pit and benches outside the Open Kitchen Sculpture Garden at 2251 N. Philip Street in North Philadelphia, and another restored historic healing pools on the grounds of St. Helena’s Church in Blue Bell. The 10 young men — Jeffrey Miles Cutcher, Marc Zamora, Evan Meiers, William Keith Bishop, Will Marcinkowski, William Ryan Cleary, Adam Pieroni, Sanjit Shelukar, Keegan McLaughlin, and Joel Harrison Bjordammen — received their badges and medals in front of more than 100 friends and family members at the official Eagle Court of Honor ceremony at the Manor House at Prophecy Creek Park.

Benjamin Rogers, 7, of Harleysville, Pa., shows off his catch with Bob Dever, an Ocean City Fishing Club member, at Open House at the pier.
OCEAN CITY FISHING CLUB
Benjamin Rogers, 7, of Harleysville, Pa., shows off his catch with Bob Dever, an Ocean City Fishing Club member, at Open House at the pier.

Open house. On Aug. 1, the Ocean City Fishing Club held its second annual open-house event at the Fishing Pier at 1557 Boardwalk to benefit the Ocean City Communjty Food Cupboard. During the two-hour event, in which visitors were shown fishing demonstrations and presented with an oral history of the century-old club, the group collected 82 pounds of nonperishable food items to benefit the area’s homeless. The club also offered a $100 donation, which was matched by an anonymous donor. “We’re looking forward to collecting more next time,” said secretary Margaret Feil.

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