8:00 AM - May 31, 2020
8:00 AM - May 31, 2020

The day after: Follow along here for the latest updates

As a citywide curfew lifts and the sun rises over Philadelphia, the focus turns to cleanup efforts after Saturday’s peaceful protest over the death of George Floyd turned destructive.

Philadelphia police reported 109 arrests, 52 for curfew violations and 43 for looting. Nearly every store was vandalized or looted on Walnut Street between 18th and 17th Streets, the pavement covered in glass from shattered windows. Hangers, boxes, and shoes were scattered from stores like Ann Taylor Loft, Steve Madden, and Vans early Sunday.

Dozens of residents walked through the street for the first time, photographing the aftermath as store alarms sounded. A few walked from store to store to start cleaning up the litter. Another citywide curfew goes into effect for Philadelphia at 8 p.m. A “Bring A Broom” event calling on Philadelphians to help in a cleanup effort is slated Sunday morning. State Sen. Anthony Williams is expected to share details on a cleanup event in West Philly Sunday afternoon.

1:20 AM - May 31, 2020
1:20 AM - May 31, 2020

Recap: Peaceful Philly protests over George Floyd’s death give way to violence, looting, arrests

The protests and violence that coursed across the country since the police-related death of a black man in Minneapolis erupted Saturday in Philadelphia, as a peaceful demonstration by thousands gave way over hours to anger and vandalism, with multiple stores being looted, buildings defaced, and police vehicles set aflame.

By nightfall, 13 police officers had been injured and at least 35 people were reported arrested. Four police vehicles were also destroyed, and at times plumes of smoke rose above the skyline.

City officials and clergy pleaded for calm, attributing most of the violence to “outside agitators” and not the nonviolent demonstrators. Still, Mayor Jim Kenney imposed an 8 p.m. curfew for the rest of the weekend, and police, many clad in helmets and batons, sought to clear the streets.

Read more of our coverage from the protests and the destruction that followed:

11:28 PM - May 30, 2020
11:28 PM - May 30, 2020

Gov. Tom Wolf signs emergency declaration to provide state assistance

Gov. Tom Wolf.
Marc Levy / AP
Gov. Tom Wolf.

Gov. Tom Wolf late Saturday signed a “disaster emergency declaration” to provide for state assistance to municipalities as they respond to the eruption of violence and property damage that occurred in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Harrisburg.

The governor’s office said in a news release that the declaration authorizes the Adjutant General of the Pennsylvania National Guard and the State Police commissioner to activate personnel and use resources as needed to secure public health and safety.

The news release did not provide further information about the status of the Pennsylvania National Guard.

“People have every right to speak out and demonstrate, but it’s unacceptable to take advantage of protests to incite violence, harm others and destroy property,” Gov. Wolf said. “This declaration authorizes the commonwealth and its agencies to assist municipalities in their response to de-escalate violence and keep our communities safe."

In a joint statement with Wolf, Mayor Jim Kenney thanked the governor for responding to Philadelphia’s request for additional state support.

“This emergency declaration will help Philadelphia access resources and police support from other jurisdictions, including other states, as we manage the impact of this weekend’s demonstrations,” Kenney said.

Earlier, Wolf announced the expanded activation of the Commonwealth Response Coordination Center at the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, or PEMA.

The governor’s office said the combined actions by Wolf authorizes PEMA to direct emergency operations in Allegheny, Dauphin and Philadelphia counties, allocating all resources and personnel as deemed necessary to cope with the situation.

—Robert Moran

11:07 PM - May 30, 2020
11:07 PM - May 30, 2020

Philly cop hospitalized after being struck by SUV in hit-and-run

A Philadelphia police officer was hospitalized with a broken arm after being struck by a hit-and-run SUV at Seventh and Chestnut Streets, police said.

The officer was injured just after 10:10 p.m. and was taken to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He was listed in stable condition.

Police later said that the the 9th District bike officer had been attempting to stop people in the SUV who were suspected of looting a business in the area when he was run over.

The vehicle, later observed in surveillance video as a white Jeep, fled the scene.

—Robert Moran

10:50 PM - May 30, 2020
10:50 PM - May 30, 2020

At least 35 people have been arrested in protests, attorney says

Police put men into a police van at 8th and Market after the Justice for George Floyd Philadelphia protest on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Police put men into a police van at 8th and Market after the Justice for George Floyd Philadelphia protest on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

At least 35 people have been arrested and are being held at the 9th District precinct on 21st Street, according to a civil rights lawyer.

Attorney Paul Hetznecker organized a team of lawyers to represent demonstrators detained.

Hetznecker said it was not yet clear what charges the individuals faced, or if they were primarily arrested during the scene at City Hall or later as looters broke into stores or curfew violators.

– Jeremy Roebuck

10:45 PM - May 30, 2020
10:45 PM - May 30, 2020

Police have blocked off parts of South Street

Police have shut down a section of South Street, where some businesses have been damaged. A group of officers on bikes blocked off South at 10th Street.

One business, Ms. Tootsie’s restaurant in the 1300 block of South, had several hand-written signs affixed to the front windows declaring “Black Owned!” and “Don’t Loot.”

—Michaelle Bond

10:30 PM - May 30, 2020
10:30 PM - May 30, 2020

Mayor Kenney says curfew will take effect again Sunday night

Mayor Jim Kenney speaks during a news conference at the city's Emergency Operations Center about protests in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Protests began peacefully Saturday, drawing thousands to City Hall and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, but later turned tense as building windows were smashed and cars set on fire in Center City.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Mayor Jim Kenney speaks during a news conference at the city's Emergency Operations Center about protests in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Protests began peacefully Saturday, drawing thousands to City Hall and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, but later turned tense as building windows were smashed and cars set on fire in Center City.

Mayor Jim Kenney announced on Twitter Saturday night the curfew will also be in effect for Sunday night, beginning at 8 p.m. and lasting until Monday morning at 6 a.m.

During these curfew hours, people are only permitted to leave their homes their homes to go to work at essential businesses or seek medical attention or police assistance.

—Rob Tornoe

10:27 PM - May 30, 2020
10:27 PM - May 30, 2020

Cops are investigating damage to Reading Terminal Market

Damage is scene at Reading Terminal Market after widespread looting in Center City on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Pranshu Verma / Staff
Damage is scene at Reading Terminal Market after widespread looting in Center City on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

On a night when storefronts across Center City are being shattered, around a dozen cops are inside Reading Terminal Market investigating damage to the building.

Two exits, one on 12th Street and the other on Arch, have been broken into. Currently, no one is inside. Cops are still on the scene investigating the damage, with at least one officer is carrying a shield.

— Pranshu Verma

9:58 PM - May 30, 2020
9:58 PM - May 30, 2020

Fires break out at Doc Martens, Wawa in Center City

As police cleared streets after the 8 p.m. curfew, the Doc Martens store on Walnut Street was the site of a major fire
Aubrey Whalen / Staff
As police cleared streets after the 8 p.m. curfew, the Doc Martens store on Walnut Street was the site of a major fire

Firefighters are battling a blaze on the 1700 block of Walnut Street. At least three firetrucks were on the scene of the Doc Martens shoe store.

They are attacking it from both sides. Behind the building on Chancellor Street, a team of firefighters broke down the door of an adjacent building and charged in as steam poured out.

On Walnut, they tended to two of their colleagues who received medical treatment while appearing dazed and sitting on the pavement. Looters continued entering stores like H&M and taking merchandise just feet away from where the firefighters tended to each other and pumped water into the building.

Police officers walking toward the fire told people they had “two minutes to vacate the street or get arrested for curfew.”

Another fire was spotted inside the Wawa at 12th and Market Streets. A man was in the building and tried to escape.

Upon his exit cops pummeled him to the ground and arrested him. The man started shouting, “I can’t breathe.”

—Sean Collins Walsh Vinny Vella, Pranshu Verma

9:51 PM - May 30, 2020
9:51 PM - May 30, 2020

Protester surprised to see looting after peaceful gathering in Philly earlier

Thousands of people move from the Art Museum back towards City Hall after a protest against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Thousands of people move from the Art Museum back towards City Hall after a protest against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Cameron Niles, who joined the protest at noon and had split off to meet up with friends, said he came back to the vicinity of Broad and Chestnut Streets to see, to his surprise, people carrying looted sneakers.

By 9 p.m., he was asking police how he could get home, north of Market Street, with the least amount of trouble.

Police were directing people away from Broad Street, which is closed, and suggesting they head east on Chestnut.

Niles said he believed George Floyd’s murder was “the straw that broke the camel’s back,” the final catalyst for years of anger and frustration towards police.

But he had been encouraged by his experience at the protest earlier.

“The day before yesterday, just in this city, there is no way in hell I would have believed that this many people that don’t look like me had good intentions for my life,” he said. “Today, I was so overwhelmed by the different faces I saw in the crowds. It made me happy to be American.”

— Aubrey Whelan

9:40 PM - May 30, 2020
9:40 PM - May 30, 2020

Police making arrests, enforcing city’s curfew

Police are beginning to take command of some streets that earlier had been swarming with protesters.

Along Chestnut Street at 15th, police formed a "V" wedge to drive people back and ordered them to leave. Police had done a similar formation on Walnut Street.

At City Hall, buses used by the city's Sheriff's Office for inmates were awaiting the dozens of people that were being arrested in the core of Center City, including at the Walgreens at Broad and Chestnut.

Police arrived at The Shops at Liberty Place in the 1600 block of Chestnut to apprehend some of the people who had breached the Bloomingdales entrance and were running out with armfuls of merchandise.

Just before 9 p.m., police tweeted that the official arrest count was 14 so far, though many more people have been seen in custody.

— Aubrey Whelan, Michaelle Bond, and Jeremy Roebuck

9:33 PM - May 30, 2020
9:33 PM - May 30, 2020

Target to close 4 Philly stores until further notice

Target announced Saturday night it is closing several of its stores in 10 states in response to protests over the death of George Floyd.

Four Target locations in Philadelphia will close until further notice: 456 N. 5th St. in Northern Liberties, 2001 Pennsylvania Ave. near the Philadelphia Art Museum, 1128 Chestnut St., and 1900 Chestnut St. near Rittenhouse Square.

Target said employees impact by the closures will be paid for up to 14 days of scheduled hours, including premium pay during the coronavirus pandemic. Employees will also be able to work at nearby Target locations.

— Rob Tornoe

9:30 PM - May 30, 2020
9:30 PM - May 30, 2020

City will enforce curfew again Sunday if needed, official says

Managing Director Brian Abernathy speaks during a news conference at the city's Emergency Operations Center about protests in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Managing Director Brian Abernathy speaks during a news conference at the city's Emergency Operations Center about protests in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd.

Brian Abernathy, the city’s managing director, said at a Saturday evening press conference that he hoped protests Sunday would remain peaceful, but added that the city would again enforce a curfew Sunday night if needed.

“We’re still in a pandemic," Abernathy said. "There are still dangers out there for our public health. People need to go home.”

—Laura McCrystal

9:20 PM - May 30, 2020
9:20 PM - May 30, 2020

Protesters have broken into the Shops at Liberty Place in Center City

Protesters have breached the Shops at Liberty Place near 17th Street.

People were spotted running through the mall and leaving with handfuls of merchandise. Earlier Saturday evening, guards inside had the doors zipped shut.

But there was no sign of them as protesters made their way in and out of the shopping mall.

—Jeremy Roebuck

9:07 PM - May 30, 2020
9:07 PM - May 30, 2020

SEPTA announces more disruptions due to police activity

SEPTA announced that trains on both the Market-Frankford Line and the Broad Street Line will bypass Spring Garden Station due to police activity.

Officers are currently making their way through the streets to enforce the city’s 8 p.m. curfew, which is in effect until 6 a.m. Sunday.

—Rob Tornoe

9:01 PM - May 30, 2020
9:01 PM - May 30, 2020

Arrests reported in Center City as police clear streets after curfew takes effect

At least four protesters were arrested outside Macy’s on Market Street. Another protester claiming he was a “legal observer” also was arrested at the department store.

At least three people were arrested at The Children’s Place Store at 16th and Chestnut Streets.

—Anna Orso, Vinny Vella, and Michaelle Bond

8:40 PM - May 30, 2020
8:40 PM - May 30, 2020

On one Center City block, every business has been looted or damaged

Wells Fargo Bank on Walnut street is vandalized.
Staff
Wells Fargo Bank on Walnut street is vandalized.

The 8 p.m. curfew did nothing to stop the looting along Chestnut Street.

Between 16th and 17th Street, every single business on the block had been looted or severely damaged as people grabbed armfuls of clothes from stores like Old Navy, J.Crew and Express.

Some pushed whole clothing racks into the streets, toppling them in the road for others to easily grab. A woman with a car full of kids pulled up in front of the shattered windows of Nordstrom Rack, jumped out and came back with a load of clothes under her arm.

“It’s okay,” she said before diving back into the car. “Mommy’s back.”

Amid the pandemonium, a line of bicycle cops remained posted about a block away, watching but doing nothing to intervene.

—Jeremy Roebuck

8:33 PM - May 30, 2020
8:33 PM - May 30, 2020

Mayor Kenney: ‘It’s been a long day. A long, difficult day.’

Mayor Jim Kenney spoke out against the “acts of violence and destruction” that unfolded in Center City as peaceful protests gave way to looting and destruction Saturday night.

“None of the today’s acts of violence or damage to property will do anything to restore faith and trust to the police and communities of color,” Kenney said. “Although anger and distrust are justified, acts of violence and destruction are never justified. We will get through this. We will continue to hold bad cops accountable and to hold those who committed these acts today accountable also.”

Kenney spoke at a news conference outside the Fire Administration building on Spring Garden Street, alongside other elected officials and religious leaders, as police officers began arresting protesters who were violating the city’s curfew by remaining out after 8 p.m.

“This measure is being taken to expedite the restoration of peace and order,” said Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw. “That is what we need: Peace, calm, and order. And it will take a unified and consistent effort to accomplish this.”

—Laura McCrystal

8:28 PM - May 30, 2020
8:28 PM - May 30, 2020

13 cops injured in protests today, Philly police commissioner says

Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw speaks during a news conference at the city's Emergency Operations Center about protests in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Protests began peacefully Saturday, drawing thousands to City Hall and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, but later turned tense as building windows were smashed and cars set on fire in Center City.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw speaks during a news conference at the city's Emergency Operations Center about protests in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020. Protests began peacefully Saturday, drawing thousands to City Hall and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, but later turned tense as building windows were smashed and cars set on fire in Center City.

Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said 13 officers had been injured Saturday afternoon. Injuries ranged from chemical burns to sprains, she said.

Mayor Jim Kenney applauded the police for showing restraint as protesters threw objects and liquids — including urine — at them.

Outlaw said about 3,000 people had gathered at the Art Museum Saturday afternoon for peaceful protests, which Kenney called “touching showings of our collective grief.”

Before the curfew took effect, Outlaw said six protesters had been arrested Saturday, but noted that she expected that number to grow. Philadelphia sought assistance from law enforcement in Montgomery and Bucks Counties and Abington Township, Outlaw said, as well as SEPTA police and local universities.

—Laura McCrystal

8:18 PM - May 30, 2020
8:18 PM - May 30, 2020

SEPTA curbs bus routes through Center City for rest of the night

A SEPTA bus earlier this month.
ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ / Staff Photographer
A SEPTA bus earlier this month.

SEPTA announced that several bus routes will not operate through Center City for the rest of the evening due to the curfew put in place by Mayor Jim Kenney.

The routes impacted are: 2, 3, 7, 9, 16, 17, 21, 23, 32, 33, 38, 44, 45, 47, 48, 49, 61, 124, and 125. Service on those routes will resume Sunday morning, according to SEPTA.

—Rob Tornoe

8:10 PM - May 30, 2020
8:10 PM - May 30, 2020

Firefighters put out a small fire at 17th and Walnut

Protesters set fire to a line of wooden chairs blocking the street at the intersection of 17th Street and Walnut Street. But it didn’t stop a police van from driving through.

Firefighters ultimately put out the small fire. Officers got out of their cars one block up at 16th and Walnut Streets, wearing helmets and carrying batons while informing people in the street of the city’s 8 p.m. curfew.

“You gotta’ walk right now," one officer said to members of the crowd.

—Michaelle Bond, Pranshu Verma, Anna Orso

7:54 PM - May 30, 2020
7:54 PM - May 30, 2020

At least four arrests have been made in Philly protests, defense lawyer says

Paul Hetznecker, a civil rights attorney that has rallied a team of lawyers to represent protesters, said there have been at least four arrests following protests in and around Center City.

Hetznecker couldn’t say what the charges were yet. at least some of those arrests were tied to police cars being set ablaze, a second attorney said.

Philadelphia police have yet to announce any arrests.

—Jeremy Roebuck

7:50 PM - May 30, 2020
7:50 PM - May 30, 2020

Protests have quieted around City Hall as curfew looms

The scene has quieted down around City Hall, where protesters broke out windows and defaced the building with graffiti earlier Saturday evening.

About 150 people gathered to listen to speaker Sixx King, who implored whites to support blacks in the fight against police brutality. “White people, we can not do this alone. We need you,” King said.

– Mensah Dean, Vinny Vella

7:46 PM - May 30, 2020
7:46 PM - May 30, 2020

Two Capitol Police officers hospitalized in Harrisburg amid protests, mayor says

In Harrisburg, hundreds of people gathered at the Capitol building and marched through the city, protesting Floyd’s death and police brutality.

Protesters chanted and held signs that read “no justice, no peace,” and “I can’t breathe.”

The peaceful demonstration later turned chaotic, as police in full riot gear clashed with protesters and, according to witnesses and social media reports, deployed what appeared to be pepper spray.

A demonstrator who did not want to be identified out of fear of online retaliation said she saw a teenage girl who had been doused with pepper spray on the ground blocks from the Capitol, near the Susquehanna River.

At the Capitol, a small number of protesters threw plastic bottles at police in riot gear barricading the entrance to the building. Two ambulances stood by. The mayor of Harrisburg, Eric Papenfuse, said in a tweet two Capitol Police officers were hospitalized and “several patrol cars [were] badly damaged by bricks.”

In a statement, Gov. Tom Wolf noted that across the state “people are protesting violence and injustice that occurs far too often against people of color.”

“Everyone should speak out because no one should be at risk of harm because of oppression or racism. We have seen these injustices happen in the commonwealth, and this week, we were all shaken by the murder of George Floyd in Minnesota,” he said. “As Pennsylvanians protest, I urge everyone involved to be peaceful and to keep each other safe.”

—Cynthia Fernandez of Spotlight PA

7:36 PM - May 30, 2020
7:36 PM - May 30, 2020

Former Philly police commissioner Ramsey: protests are ‘very troubling’

Former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey in 2017.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey in 2017.

Former Philadelphia police commissioner Charles Ramsey called Saturday’s protests “very troubling" and said the city’s 8 p.m. curfew for tonight made sense, given the scale and destruction of the protests.

“It’s not even dark yet, and usually when you start to get this kind of activity, it’s at nightfall,” Ramsey said on CNN. “This is very troubling. I think it’s going to be a very, very long night.”

Ramsey said the images coming out of Philadelphia are unfortunate, and pointed out it appears to be small group of people co-opting legitimate protests over the death of George Floyd.

“Unfortunately there is group of people that come to these things that have no intention of doing anything else other than causing problems,” Ramsey said. “They could care less about what took place in Minneapolis — they’re there to cause damage. It’s a small group of people, but they’re there nonetheless.”

—Rob Tornoe

7:30 PM - May 30, 2020
7:30 PM - May 30, 2020

Transit officers confront protesters and guard looted stores

About a dozen SEPTA transit officers confronted protesters on Chestnut Street. Protesters threw bottles and trash at them.

SEPTA officers stood in front of heavily looted stores, including the Modelle’s near 16th. They were pelted by water bottles and other trash.

Among the detritus in the middle of Chestnut between 17th and 18th were an overturned piano, a fake tree, and a mannequin torso.

—Anna Orso, Vinny Vella, Michaelle Bond

7:21 PM - May 30, 2020
7:21 PM - May 30, 2020

Chipotle is still doing takeout as protesters loot other stores

Amid the looting and breaking into stores along Chestnut Street in Center City, Chipotle remained untouched.

The restaurant was carrying on with its takeout business. Protesters were among its customers Saturday evening.

—Vinny Vella

7:09 PM - May 30, 2020
7:09 PM - May 30, 2020

Protesters take break in Rittenhouse Square, Center City residents watch destruction

Some protesters took a break in Rittenhouse Square on Saturday evening, while others in the park enjoyed picnics.

Business owners and residents in apartment buildings on Chestnut and Sansom Streets watched the protests and looting from their windows. Some apartment buildings, such as The Ellington and 15th and Chestnut, had security guards standing at the doors.

— Aubrey Whelan, Jeremy Roebuck

6:56 PM - May 30, 2020
6:56 PM - May 30, 2020

Protesters looting stores on Chestnut, Walnut Streets

Protests over the killing of George Floyd boiled over into vandalism and looting in Philadelphia, with windows smashed and storefronts burned on Chestnut Street around 7 p.m. on May 30.
Anna Orso / Staff
Protests over the killing of George Floyd boiled over into vandalism and looting in Philadelphia, with windows smashed and storefronts burned on Chestnut Street around 7 p.m. on May 30.

Protesters smashed the windows of several stores along Chestnut and Walnut Streets in Center City, as Saturday’s protests stretched into the evening.

The looted stores included a nail salon, Foot Locker, H&M, Square 1682, Marathon, the Vans store, Ubiq, T-Mobile, Doc Martens, Champion, and Steve Madden, and Philly Runner.

A group of demonstrators banged on the glass walls of the Apple store.

A police car along Chestnut Street had a smashed window, and another had anarchist symbols spray painted on it. Almost every window at the Wells Fargo on Chestnut was broken.

A fire was ignited in the middle of the intersection of 16th and Sansom Streets. Some protesters helped Philadelphia firefighters put it out.

—Aubrey Whelan, Vinny Vella, Anna Orso

6:47 PM - May 30, 2020
6:47 PM - May 30, 2020

Eastbound Schuylkill Expressway closed between Spring Garden and Grays Ferry

The eastbound Schuylkill Expressway has been closed between Spring Garden and Grays Ferry due to the protests.

All traffic is being directed off at Spring Garden, and delays stretch back past Montgomery Avenue, according to Google Maps.

– Rob Tornoe

6:42 PM - May 30, 2020
6:42 PM - May 30, 2020

Mayor Kenney sets 8 p.m citywide curfew

Mayor Jim Kenney announced a citywide curfew Saturday, effective at 8 p.m.

“Only persons with essential duties will be permitted outdoors,” Philadelphia police announced in a tweet.

The curfew will remain in effect until 6 a.m. Sunday.

—Laura McCrystal

6:37 PM - May 30, 2020
6:37 PM - May 30, 2020

Police have moved protesters away from City Hall

Smoke covers City Hall seen from North Broad Street amid protests in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Smoke covers City Hall seen from North Broad Street amid protests in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

After demonstrators broke windows in City Hall and spray painted outside walls, police officers have moved the crowd away from the building.

Police cleared much of the plaza in Dilworth Park, some holding bikes to push back the crowd.

There were some confrontations between police and demonstrators as the police moved the crowds back away from City Hall. Some demonstrators chanted “white people to the front” to protect the black demonstrators from the advancing police.

—Sean Collins Walsh, Aubrey Whelan

6:33 PM - May 30, 2020
6:33 PM - May 30, 2020

Starbucks outside City Hall set on fire

After being broken into, the Starbucks outside City Hall was set on fire as protesters recorded the growing blaze with their cellphones.

Police shifted away from their location alongside City Hall to move people away from Starbucks.

—Mensah Dean, Oona Goodin-Smith

6:26 PM - May 30, 2020
6:26 PM - May 30, 2020

Protesters looting Center City stores

Protesters broke into some Center City stores and looted them on Saturday afternoon.

Windows were smashed and items removed from the Foot Locker on Chestnut Street, as well as H&M. Police officers stood guard outside the Apple store.

—Vinny Vella, Anna Orso

6:19 PM - May 30, 2020
6:19 PM - May 30, 2020

Tensions rise as protesters throw bottles at SWAT officers

A photographer takes a photo of a burning police cruiser in Center City while demonstrators protest in the Justice for George Floyd Philadelphia on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
YONG KIM / Staff Photographer
A photographer takes a photo of a burning police cruiser in Center City while demonstrators protest in the Justice for George Floyd Philadelphia on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Demonstrators clashed with police outside City Hall as tensions rose Saturday evening.

Protesters threw glass bottles and metal barricades at SWAT officers. A woman spit on a police officer. Others grabbed metal barricades and used them to push the line of police officers closer to the walls of City Hall.

And some threw bagels at police officers and told them to “eat up.” The officers used bikes and batons to push protesters back away from City Hall, where they have smashed windows and doors.

—Anna Orso, Vinny Vella, Aubrey Whelan, Jeremy Roebuck

6:08 PM - May 30, 2020
6:08 PM - May 30, 2020

Protesters break into Starbucks in Dilworth Park

George Floyd protests in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Aubrey Whelan / Staff
George Floyd protests in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Protesters broke into the Starbucks in Dilworth Park and took drinks from inside. “Anybody want a latte?” one protester yelled as the windows broke.

Some protesters began throwing bottles and trash cans as the police formed a line around City Hall to protect the building.

Another group of demonstrators chanted “hands up, don’t shoot” outside City Hall as they turned toward the line of police.

—Aubrey Whelan, Vinny Vella

6:02 PM - May 30, 2020
6:02 PM - May 30, 2020

Fire set in Dilworth Park Cafe, City Hall window smashed

Dilworth Cafe on Saturday.
Anna Orso / Staff
Dilworth Cafe on Saturday.

Demonstrators broke into the cafe in Dilworth Park outside City Hall and set a fire inside.

They broke through the glass doors of the cafe and knocked over planers outside.

Windows and doors to City Hall were also smashed, and messages such as “it is right to rebel” were spray painted on walls of the building.

Nearby, the windows of a TD Bank were also smashed and George Floyd’s name was written on another window.

—Anna Orso, Oona Goodin-Smith

5:57 PM - May 30, 2020
5:57 PM - May 30, 2020

Fireworks set off near City Hall as police cars burn

A police car burns near the Municipal Services building in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Vinny Vella/ Staff
A police car burns near the Municipal Services building in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Thick smoke billowed around City Hall as police cars burned and fireworks were set off around the burning cars Saturday.

Protesters cheered as the gas tanks of the cars exploded. Police stepped away from the vicinity of the cars.

—Oona Goodin-Smith, Mensah Dean

5:42 PM - May 30, 2020
5:42 PM - May 30, 2020

Mayor Kenney tells protesters to ‘return home’

George Floyd protests near the Municipal Services building in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Tyger Williams / The Philadelphia Inquirer
George Floyd protests near the Municipal Services building in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Mayor Jim Kenney asked demonstrators to go home Saturday, tweeting that “the anger being displayed now cannot continue.”

Kenney said the peaceful protests Saturday afternoon “were touching showings of our collective grief.”

He asked residents to go home. “Please have respect and dignity for each other and return home,” Kenney tweeted.

—Laura McCrystal

5:31 PM - May 30, 2020
5:31 PM - May 30, 2020

Police cars burn at City Hall

Two police cars were engulfed in flames outside City Hall at about 5:30 p.m. Saturday.

Nearby, an unmarked black car was also set on fire. And protesters flipped over another car in front of City Hall.

—Aubrey Whelan, Vinny Vella

5:31 PM - May 30, 2020
5:31 PM - May 30, 2020

Philly police urge residents to stay out of Center City: violence ‘will not be tolerated’

Philadelphia police warned residents to stay out of Center City and said that they would not tolerate vandalism Saturday, as protests continued and a group of demonstrators tried to burn or tear down the statue of former Mayor Frank Rizzo.

“The demonstrators exercising their first amendment rights at City Hall and the Art Museum did do peacefully,” the police tweeted.

“However, since that time, others have convened in Center City and are committing criminal acts, including vandalism. Those acts will not be tolerated and we strongly encourage everyone to refrain from entering Center City.”

—Laura McCrystal

5:27 PM - May 30, 2020
5:27 PM - May 30, 2020

Clash continues at Rizzo statue, small fire smolders

George Floyd protests near the Municipal Services building in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Tyger Williams / The Philadelphia Inquirer
George Floyd protests near the Municipal Services building in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Police moved their line and metal barriers closer to the statue of former Mayor Frank Rizzo, attempting to move the crowd back.

Some demonstrators retreated from the line, coughing and covering their eyes. Protesters burned a flag tied to the statue, and a small fire was smoldering at its base.

—Aubrey Whelan, Laura McCrystal

5:13 PM - May 30, 2020
5:13 PM - May 30, 2020

Demonstrators target armored police vehicle near City Hall

Demonstrators near City Hall moved toward an armored police vehicle Saturday afternoon and threw things at it, including traffic cones.

Police sprayed what appeared to be liquid at the crowd from inside the vehicle, but it was not clear what they were spraying.

The crowd of protesters then lifted road barriers and threw them at the armored vehicle, which slowly pushed through the crowd. By the time it drove up Broad Street, the vehicle had anarchy symbols spray painted on it. It drove away as a crowd of protesters shouted.

— Jeremy Roebuck

5:06 PM - May 30, 2020
5:06 PM - May 30, 2020

Crowd tries to set fire to Rizzo statue

Protesters tried to set fire to the Rizzo statue, which has also been spray painted. Protesters wrote “pig” across Rizzo’s chest.

A small fire rose from the base of the statue at about 5 p.m. Saturday.

5:01 PM - May 30, 2020
5:01 PM - May 30, 2020

Protesters clash with motorists near Vine and Broad

A man reacts after tear gas was released near Broad and Vine in Philadelphia after a protest against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
A man reacts after tear gas was released near Broad and Vine in Philadelphia after a protest against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Protesters stopped traffic near Broad and Vine Streets, getting into confrontations with motorists.

The demonstrators blocking the intersection allowed some cars to pass, but stopped others.

Some drivers made U-turns on Vine Street and drove away in the opposite direction.

Mensah Dean

4:52 PM - May 30, 2020
4:52 PM - May 30, 2020

Protesters gather around Rizzo statue: ‘Tear it down!’

Police guard the statue of former Philadelphia mayor Frank Rizzo as protesters marched in Center City on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Anna Orso / Staff
Police guard the statue of former Philadelphia mayor Frank Rizzo as protesters marched in Center City on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

A crowd of demonstrators gathered around the statue of former Mayor Frank Rizzo in front of the Municipal Services building Saturday afternoon, pulling on a cord tied around its arm.

“Tear it down!” some in the crowd shouted.

Banging sounds could be heard from the statue, which shook as demonstrators climbed on it and a person swung from a piece of metal fencing hooked into the hand of the statue.

Earlier Saturday afternoon, a line of police officers on motorcycles had guarded the statue. There were cops outside the Municipal Services Building as the crowd converged on the statue, but none appeared to be immediately around the statue itself.

—Aubrey Whelan, Laura McCrystal

4:42 PM - May 30, 2020
4:42 PM - May 30, 2020

State Police stop traffic on 676 Eastbound

People face off against a line of state police during a protest near Broad and Vine in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
People face off against a line of state police during a protest near Broad and Vine in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Pennsylvania State Police have stopped traffic on 676 Eastbound while protesters clear out from Broad and Vine Street.

The officers on site refused to answer the Inquirer’s questions as to how long traffic will be stopped.

“I don’t even trust these cops,” LaMont Wilson, 25, of Northeast Philadelphia, said while waiting for the traffic to clear. “They could come out shooting any moment.

—Pranshu Verma

4:35 PM - May 30, 2020
4:35 PM - May 30, 2020

Police car fire extinguished as crowd marches to City Hall

People face off against a line of state police during a protest near Broad and Vine in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
People face off against a line of state police during a protest near Broad and Vine in Philadelphia against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Some demonstrators in the crowd gathered at Broad and Vine Streets marched to City Hall after a police car caught on fire Saturday afternoon.

The fire was extinguished, but a crowd of demonstrators still remained in the area.

Police formed a line along Vine and Broad, face to face with protesters, but took no action to advance into the crowd.

— Anna Orso, Oona Goodin-Smith, Sean Collins Walsh

3:46 PM - May 30, 2020
3:46 PM - May 30, 2020

Police car set on fire at Broad and Vine as tensions rise

A Pennsylvania State police vehicle caught fire at the intersection of Broad and Vine Streets Saturday afternoon as tensions rose between demonstrators and police.

Police in protective gear sought to move the crowd back, and some of the demonstrators moved away from the scene after something had been sprayed in their eyes and loud bangs were heard in the area.

Anna Orso, Sean Collins Walsh, Oona Goodin-Smith

3:30 PM - May 30, 2020
3:30 PM - May 30, 2020

Demonstrators spray paint buildings, vandalize police vehicles as police guard Rizzo statue

As demonstrators marched through Philadelphia on Saturday afternoon, some spray painted messages on buildings and vandalized state police vehicles.

Protesters climbed on top of Pennsylvania State Police vehicles guarding the entrance to Interstate 676, spray painted one of them, and smashed windows.

The scene grew tense as police, wearing helmets and holding batons, tried to move protesters away from the state police vehicles at the entrance to the highway.

Buildings and trash cans along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway were also spray painted with messages like “Black Lives Matter” and “Justice 4 Floyd.”

"Black Lives Matter" is spray-painted on a building as protesters marched in Center City on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Oona Goodin-Smith / Staff
"Black Lives Matter" is spray-painted on a building as protesters marched in Center City on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Philadelphia police officers, meanwhile, stood guard over the statue of former Philadelphia Mayor Frank L. Rizzo — a frequent target of vandalism — in front of the Municipal Services Building.

The Rizzo statue has been controversial for years. Opponents Rizzo should not be celebrated, because the tough-talking mayor discriminated against minorities and gays. Rizzo’s supporters have argued that he was a law-and-order mayor, but not a racist.

Police guard the statue of former Philadelphia mayor Frank Rizzo as protesters marched in Center City on Saturday.
Anna Orso / Staff
Police guard the statue of former Philadelphia mayor Frank Rizzo as protesters marched in Center City on Saturday.

Mayor Jim Kenney announced in 2017 that the statue would be moved. That move is set for 2021, but no location has been chosen.

Oona Goodin-Smith, Anna Orso

3:12 PM - May 30, 2020
3:12 PM - May 30, 2020

‘We raise our children in fear,’ one Philly mother and teacher says

As crowd of demonstrators in Philadelphia grew, Jamial Hankinson, 50, became emotional while holding a sign proclaiming “I am an angry black woman!”

“We have every right to be angry because we live in fear, we raise our children in fear,” the mother of two said. “That trauma is in us and we just pass it on from generation to generation. I’m angry and I’m tired of it. These things should continue to get larger until something is done about it,” she said, looking over the crowd.

Hankinson, a teacher at Henry C. Lea Elementary School in Philadelphia, has a 27-year-old son and 29 year old daughter.

Mensah Dean

3:00 PM - May 30, 2020
3:00 PM - May 30, 2020

Minnesota governor mobilizes state National Guard; mayors accuse out-of-state ‘agitating’ for violence

A member of the Minnesota National Guard stands guard by the State Capitol in St. Paul, Minn.
Glen Stubbe / AP
A member of the Minnesota National Guard stands guard by the State Capitol in St. Paul, Minn.

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz on Saturday said that he was “fully” mobilizing the state’s National Guard, a first in the state’s history, saying that it was “nothing short of a blessing” that an innocent bystander has not yet been killed in unrest.

His announcement comes after protests raged across America on a brutal night in cities where people gathered to grieve and demand justice for George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody. At least 20 U.S. cities woke up to destruction and arrests Saturday morning after unrest over the death of Floyd boiled over in the Twin Cities, sparking demonstrations - some peaceful, others violent - across the country.

“Let’s be very clear, the situation in Minneapolis is no longer in any way about the murder of George Floyd,” Walz, a Democrat, said.

— Associated Press

2:58 PM - May 30, 2020
2:58 PM - May 30, 2020

Wilmington protesters smash police SUV windows, take over I-95

Protests are taking place across the country, including in Wilmington, where demonstrators were seen smashing the windows of a police SUV and on I-95.

2:42 PM - May 30, 2020
2:42 PM - May 30, 2020

Activist contrasts Minneapolis demonstrations with Philly MOVE bombing

Demonstrators gather on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art during a Justice for George Floyd Philadelphia protest on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Demonstrators gather on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art during a Justice for George Floyd Philadelphia protest on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Speaking to protesters at the Art Museum steps, Mike Africa Jr. of the MOVE organization compared protesters’ burning of a police precinct in Minneapolis to the 1985 bombing of the MOVE compound in West Philadelphia that killed 11 people, including five children.

“We are here in the city of Philadelphia, the birthplace of liberty, the quote-unquote city of brotherly love, but on May 13, 1985, this very city flew a helicopter over my family’s house and dropped a bomb on it, and they were not concerned about the building burning,” he said through a bullhorn. “I don’t give a damn about no building burning in Minneapolis.”

After gathering and chanting at the Art Museum, the crowd of demonstrators in Philadelphia began marching down Benjamin Franklin Parkway toward City Hall.

Sean Collins Walsh

2:23 PM - May 30, 2020
2:23 PM - May 30, 2020

Photos: Scenes from protest at Philly Art Museum

Demonstrators march along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway toward the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Saturday as the protest the death of George Floyd.
YONG KIM / Staff Photographer
Demonstrators march along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway toward the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Saturday as the protest the death of George Floyd.
Demonstrators gather on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art Saturday.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Demonstrators gather on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art Saturday.
2:02 PM - May 30, 2020
2:02 PM - May 30, 2020

Hundreds of demonstrators fill Art Museum steps

Hundreds of protestors filled the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Saturday afternoon for a demonstration organized by the city’s Black Lives Matter group.

Wielding signs and face masks, hundreds stood on the steps of the museum, chanting George Floyd’s name, and calling for “justice, now.”

Nearly all demonstrators wore masks, but few stayed six feet apart from one another as the size of the crowd swelled.

Philadelphia police officers kept a distance from the crowd, standing near the entrance to the museum and at the top of the steps.

Anna Orso, Oona Goodin-Smith

1:54 PM - May 30, 2020
1:54 PM - May 30, 2020

‘It felt like the final straw’: Philly demonstrators explain why they showed up

Deyauna Fisher, of West Philly, brought her 5-year-old son Dean to Saturday’s protest outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and he held a cardboard sign that read “Black Lives Matter.” On the way out of their home, she said she explained they were gathering with others “to help make the world better.”

He responded: “I hope the world feels better soon.”

Jasmine Moore, 19, said she had never been to a protest against police treatment of African-Americans but felt she had to attend on Saturday.

“It felt like the final straw,” said Moore, who lives in Philly. “I’m tired of the injustice, the brutality.”

Georgia Getz, 53, of Graduate Hospital, said when she saw the video of Floyd dying, “I thought just how unreal it seemed, but it’s not. It was real. That’s the problem.”

Gretz, who is white, said she was named for the Ray Charles song and raised in Center City to respect black culture. That’s why she came out to the protest, she said.

“My whole family has been fighting for racial equality for three generations. I deeply feel this in my bones. So, I always show up — ride or die.”

Anna Orso, Sean Collins Walsh, Mensah Dean

1:47 PM - May 30, 2020
1:47 PM - May 30, 2020

Across the nation, National Guard summoned to aid cities amid police clashes

Protesters burned businesses in Minneapolis. They smashed police cars and windows in Atlanta, broke into police headquarters in Portland, Oregon, and chanted curses at President Donald Trump outside the White House. Thousands also demonstrated peacefully, demanding justice for George Floyd, a black man who died after a white officer pressed a knee into his neck.

As anger over Floyd’s killing spread to cities nationwide, local leaders increasingly said they could need help from National Guardsmen or even military police to contain the unrest.

Georgia’s governor declared a state of emergency early Saturday to activate the state National Guard as violence flared in Atlanta. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler also declared an emergency and ordered a nighttime curfew for the city.

Another 500 Guard soldiers were mobilized in and around Minneapolis, where Floyd died and an officer faced charges Friday in his death. But after another night of watching fires burn and businesses ransacked, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said early Saturday that he was moving to activate more than 1,000 more and was considering federal help.

— Associated Press

1:40 PM - May 30, 2020
1:40 PM - May 30, 2020

Photos: Scenes of unrest as protests sweep the country

12:57 PM - May 30, 2020
12:57 PM - May 30, 2020

Philly demonstrators march from City Hall toward Art Museum

A crowd of demonstrators began marching from Philadelphia City Hall down John F. Kennedy Boulevard just before 1 p.m. Saturday, stopping traffic in the area.

Organizers said the group would continue to the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where the city’s Black Lives Matter group plans to begin a protest at 2 p.m.

Anna Orso, Mensah Dean, Oona Goodin-Smith

12:50 PM - May 30, 2020
12:50 PM - May 30, 2020

Photos: Philadelphians gather to mourn George Floyd

12:36 PM - May 30, 2020
12:36 PM - May 30, 2020

Police watch from a distance as demonstrators at City Hall chant peacefully

Protesters gather at City Hall and kneel to mourn the death of George Floyd on Saturday.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Protesters gather at City Hall and kneel to mourn the death of George Floyd on Saturday.

After gathering at Dilworth Park to kneel silently for nine minutes, a group of about 150 demonstrators remained outside City Hall, chanting and holding signs.

Police officers, mostly bike patrol, stood about 25 yards away. Several officers in plain clothes also stood closer to the demonstrators.

Some demonstrators chanted “I can’t breathe” and “Justice for Floyd.”

A 28-year-old protester who would only give his name as K.C. said coming out to show support for Floyd felt imperative.

“It’s become a demand of support, not just an option, for everybody in every state,” he said. “We should treat every person as if it’s a family member.”

K.C. said he hoped the protest would remain peaceful but wasn’t sure.

“I hope it’s going to be peaceful, but given what’s been happening in Atlanta and New York, I’m not too sure,” he said.

The organizers of the City Hall demonstration said they planned to join another protest scheduled to begin outside the Art Museum at 2 p.m.

Laura McCrystal, Sean Collins Walsh, Mensah Dean, Anna Orso, Oona Goodin-Smith

12:23 PM - May 30, 2020
12:23 PM - May 30, 2020

Nine minutes of silent kneeling in Philly

Demonstrators kneel in silence for nine minutes outside of Philadelphia City Hall as they mourn the death of George Floyd on Saturday.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Demonstrators kneel in silence for nine minutes outside of Philadelphia City Hall as they mourn the death of George Floyd on Saturday.
Demonstrators kneel in silence for nine minutes outside of Philadelphia City Hall as they mourn the death of George Floyd on Saturday.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Demonstrators kneel in silence for nine minutes outside of Philadelphia City Hall as they mourn the death of George Floyd on Saturday.
11:56 AM - May 30, 2020
11:56 AM - May 30, 2020

Demonstrators kneel at Philly City Hall ‘to mourn George Floyd’

Protesters gather Saturday at Philadelphia City Hall, holding signs mourning the death of George Floyd.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Protesters gather Saturday at Philadelphia City Hall, holding signs mourning the death of George Floyd.

A group of about 150 people gathered at Philadelphia City Hall before noon on Saturday to protest the death of George Floyd. They knelt silently in Dilworth Park for nine minutes, the same amount of time they said the police knelt on Floyd’s neck in Minneapolis.

Josh Yeboah, who said he organized the protest, said demonstrators are “here to mourn George Floyd.”

He called for peace and asked demonstrators to follow social-distancing guidelines. “This is going to be a peaceful protest,” he said. “We are social distancing from police.”

Demonstrators knelt and held signs, some that read “I can’t breathe” and “Justice for George.” A man near the front of the crowd held a sign above his head that read: “That could have been me.”

Protesters hold signs at City Hall to protest against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Protesters hold signs at City Hall to protest against the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

They maintained six feet of distance between them as they knelt, and nearly all wore masks. About a dozen police officers on bikes and motorcycles watched nearby, on the street just outside Dilworth Park.

After the nine minutes of kneeling, demonstrators stayed outside City Hall, holding signs and repeating chants such as “I can’t breathe" and “Say his name: George Floyd.”

Anna Orso, Mensah Dean, Oona Goodin-Smith

11:20 AM - May 30, 2020
11:20 AM - May 30, 2020

Mayor Jim Kenney vows Philly police will be respectful, says city has experience handling large demonstrations

A day before a planned demonstration outside City Hall over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Mayor Jim Kenney on Friday vowed that police will treat the protesters with respect, and said he was hopeful the city will avoid the destruction seen in some demonstrations elsewhere.

“In the midst of a global pandemic, America’s original sin of racism has not gone dormant,” Kenney said at a virtual news conference. “Black Americans are outraged, and they should be. I’m outraged, too. As a white man, I will never know the heartbreak and trauma that the black community continues to experience. But I want black Philadelphians to know that I and other city leaders stand with them and are here to support them during this painful time.”

— Sean Collins Walsh

11:15 AM - May 30, 2020
11:15 AM - May 30, 2020

Pentagon puts military police on alert to go to Minneapolis

A protestor runs past burning cars and buildings on Chicago Avenue, Saturday, May 30, 2020, in St. Paul, Minn.
John Minchillo / AP
A protestor runs past burning cars and buildings on Chicago Avenue, Saturday, May 30, 2020, in St. Paul, Minn.

As unrest spread across dozens of American cities on Friday, the Pentagon took the rare step of ordering the Army to put several active-duty U.S. military police units on the ready to deploy to Minneapolis, where the police killing of George Floyd sparked the widespread protests.

Soldiers from Fort Bragg in North Carolina and Fort Drum in New York have been ordered to be ready to deploy within four hours if called, according to three people with direct knowledge of the orders. Soldiers in Fort Carson, in Colorado, and Fort Riley in Kansas have been told to be ready within 24 hours. The people did not want their names used because they were not authorized to discuss the preparations.

The get-ready orders were sent verbally on Friday, after President Donald Trump asked Defense Secretary Mark Esper for military options to help quell the unrest in Minneapolis after protests descended into looting and arson in some parts of the city.

— Associated Press

11:10 AM - May 30, 2020
11:10 AM - May 30, 2020

Demonstrations planned in Philly for Saturday afternoon

As protests continue in Minneapolis and other cities across the country following the death of George Floyd, Philadelphia demonstrations are planned for Saturday afternoon.

Philadelphia’s Black Lives Matter group has planned a demonstration beginning at 2 p.m. outside the Art Museum. On its Facebook page, the group said the gathering is for not only Floyd, but “all our family members we’ve lost to police violence, and all Black communities terrorized by police.” Another gathering in Philadelphia is planned for noon at City Hall, where organizers say they will kneel in peaceful protest over Floyd’s death.

Mayor Jim Kenney said Friday that he shares in the outrage of black Philadelphians, and said the police will respect the First Amendment rights of protesters. “We’ll be respectful, and we expect people to be respectful and to express their anger, express their concern,” Kenney said.

— Laura McCrystal

11:00 AM - May 30, 2020
11:00 AM - May 30, 2020

Minneapolis police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck charged with murder; protests spread across U.S.

Police officers protect themselves with shields as protesters throw debris during a rally Friday in Brooklyn.
Frank Franklin II / AP
Police officers protect themselves with shields as protesters throw debris during a rally Friday in Brooklyn.

The white Minneapolis police officer who pressed his knee into George Floyd’s neck as he begged for air was arrested Friday and charged with murder, and crowds broke overnight curfews imposed to try to stem violent protests over police killings of African Americans that have spread to cities across the U.S.

On Minneapolis’ south side, officers fired tear gas and rubber bullets to drive back crowds of protesters who then set cars and businesses on fire and broke into stores, including some near a police station.

Shortly before midnight, scores of officers on foot and in vehicles moved in to curb the violence a day after city and state leaders faced blowback for their handling of the crisis. Protesters on Thursday torched a police station soon after it was abandoned by police and vandalized dozens of businesses.

— Associated Press