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— Keith Pompey (offthedribble@inquirer.com)

Colangelo ready to move on from Twitter-gate

Bryan Colangelo has been mostly quiet about his resignation as the 76ers president of basketball operations and general manager on June 7, 2018.

That ended a stunning nine-day saga that began when a website report tied Colangelo to damaging and anonymous Twitter accounts.

The Sixers hired a law firm based in New York to investigate allegations first published by The Ringer, a sports and pop culture website. The firm concluded that Colangelo’s wife, Barbara Bottini, was responsible for creating and posting from the anonymous accounts but that Colangelo was “the source of the sensitive, non-public, club-related information” the accounts shared. The statement further called Colangelo “careless and in some instances reckless” in safeguarding that information.

Last month, Colangelo purchased an ownership stake and will assume an advisory role with the Hawks of Australia’s National Basketball League. He recently spoke to The Sydney Morning Herald about his Sixers’ departure.

“Once that investigation was completed and I was absolved, I felt the appropriate thing to do - in conjunction with ownership there in Philly - was to mutually walk away,” Colangelo told the paper. “It was a difficult decision and a difficult time for me. But I have to say, it was very difficult for my family.

“Because of some of the reasons that came to light, it was something I thought was important not to talk about, quite frankly. And we’re still dealing with that.”

Colangelo said he tried to stay positive while preserving, loving and protecting his family’s interests.

“Frankly, two years on, it’s gone. It’s in the past and I’m ready to move on.”

Former 76ers general manager Bryan Colangelo has purchased a stake in an Australian pro team.
Steven M. Falk / Staff Photographer
Former 76ers general manager Bryan Colangelo has purchased a stake in an Australian pro team.

Starting Five

Bucks latest team to shut down practice facility

Who’s next?

This weekend, the Milwaukee Bucks became the latest NBA team to shut down its practice facility for workouts until departing for Orlando due to at least one person testing positive for COVID-19, according to reports.

The Brooklyn Nets, Denver Nuggets, Miami Heat and Los Angeles Clippers were among the other teams to shut down their facilities this past week. All five teams are competing in the 22-team NBA restart at Walt Disney World.

Teams will travel there Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, with the Bucks scheduled to leave on Thursday.

Giannis Antetokounmpo and the Bucks can't work out in their Milwaukee practice facility.
Morry Gash / AP
Giannis Antetokounmpo and the Bucks can't work out in their Milwaukee practice facility.

Important Dates:

July 24: Sixers vs. Memphis Grizzlies (scrimmage) at The Arena, 3:30 p.m.

July 26: Sixers vs. Oklahoma City Thunder (scrimmage) at HP Fieldhouse, noon.

July 28: Sixers vs. Dallas Mavericks (scrimmage) at HP Fieldhouse, 8:30 p.m.

Aug. 1: Sixers vs. Indiana Pacers at VISA Athletic Center, 7 p.m.

Aug. 3: San Antonio Spurs vs. Sixers at VISA Athletic Center, 8 p.m.

All of the events are at Walt Disney World.

Passing the Rock

Send questions by email or on Twitter (@PompeyOnSixers)

Question: Sadly, I’m gonna ask the same question I think should be asked on any sports-related item right now. Is any number of deaths caused by restarting the league acceptable? If so, how many? Nobody seems to be writing that. — @HandNik on Twitter

Answer: Thanks for the deep question. I really appreciate and respect you for asking this. I don’t think any number of deaths caused by restarting the league is acceptable. Nor does the NBA. I do think the league’s bubble-like atmosphere will be one of the safest places on the earth if everyone in there follows protocol.

I literally shook my head when I looked at all of the restrictions.

Twenty-two NBA teams will resume the season at Disney Wide World of Sports complex in Kissimmee, Fla.
John Raoux / AP
Twenty-two NBA teams will resume the season at Disney Wide World of Sports complex in Kissimmee, Fla.