After graduating from college, with my competitive cheerleading days behind me, I needed something to fill that void…a new passion. Enter running. I was immediately hooked and ran my first 5K a few months later. My lungs burned, my face was red, and my legs seized but I wanted to do it again. That Fall, I ran my first half marathon, the Philadelphia Distance Run, with Team in Training. Two years later I ran the Marine Corps Marathon. I was smitten…and my love for distance running was sparked.

Fifteen years later, I have completed an ultramarathon, 11 marathons (PR 3:41), and dozens of half marathons (PR 1:41). I would say the marathon distance is by far my favorite.

My favorite marathon was definitely Boston, which I ran in 2012. Qualifying for and running Boston were a dream come true. It took me 9 marathons to qualify so I know the hard work and discipline that goes into a BQ. Helping others achieve their dream of qualifying for Boston is one of my favorite aspects of coaching.

After years of helping family and friends train for races, I decided to make it official and became an RRCA-certified running coach in April 2010. Soon after that I started Run The Long Road Coaching. In August 2013 I added another credential: NASM-certified personal trainer.

I strongly believe that success in running comes down to hard work, consistency, and determination. Over the years, I have lowered my marathon finish time substantially. I accomplished this on my own with some trial and error and figuring out what works best for me.  I do the same with each and every client. Each training plan is personalized to his/her current fitness level and goals. For a training plan to work, it must fit around the client's lifestyle.

I take on all of my clients' goals as if they were my own. I coach runners locally and across the country and I'm deeply involved with every aspect of their training – not just the physical but also the mental. I strive to get my clients to the starting line healthy and determined to achieve their goal. Believing in your training is just as important as doing the training itself.

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