DeMarco Murray, whose inability to thrive in Chip Kelly's offense has to rank among the top 5 reasons Kelly is no longer coaching the Eagles, said he and Kelly have spoken over the phone since Kelly's Tuesday dismissal.

Murray wouldn't say who initiated the call, or reveal much of what was said, beyond that they wished each other well. Murray did deny that he said anything to Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie that would have played into Kelly's firing, during their much-discussed confab on the charter flight back from the New England game.

"This is my first time experiencing something like this," Murray said. "You never wish anything bad upon anyone. Obviously, we're dealing with people's families, things of that nature ... As human beings, you feel bad for people."

Asked about how Kelly used Murray, last year's NFL rushing champion with Dallas, now with 633 yards on just 181 carries after signing a five-year, $40 million free agent contract with the Eagles, Murray said: "He's had a lot of success with things that he's done on offense ... He's had success with lots of different types of running backs ... I just think schematically, there were some things we could have done differently. Obviously, we all could have played better."

"I'm  a quiet guy. I think he was a quiet guy as well," Murray said when asked if he found Kelly approachable. "In the past, coaches I've had have been a little more outspoken ... He's had a lot of success and I wish him the best."

Asked what sort of coach he wants, Murray mentioned a strong work ethic and having "a connection with the players, mentally and emotionally, as well."

Murray wouldn't say what sort of offense he is hoping for, but he said he expects to be here, and he agreed that a new coach is "a fresh start for everyone."

Murray said he will "work diligently to fit the scheme," whether the new offense runs from under center or from the shotgun, where he seemed to struggle under Kelly.