In the Region

NakedWines selling to Pa.

A pioneering California online wine-sales firm, NakedWines.com, has signed up nearly 3,000 Pennsylvania customers, which it calls its "Angel" class, who are buying wine, via online orders, by the case, for direct delivery - avoiding state-owned Liquor Control Board stores, founder Ryan O'Connell said. "PLCB charges a flat fee of $4.50 per order," which isn't that much when it is split per bottle over one or more 12-bottle cases, O'Connell said. The firm said Pennsylvania is among its fastest-growing markets. O'Connell said he expects that more and larger firms will be entering the business and selling directly to Pennsylvanians now that his company and a few others have gotten their feet in the door. - Joseph N. DiStefano

New hotel for Center City

Pearl Properties plans a 206-room Cambria hotel at the current site of a garage that it owns near Broad and Locust Streets, according to the lodging chain's parent, Choice Hotels International of Rockville, Md. The company expects the hotel at 219 S. Broad St. to open in 2017. - Jacob Adelman

Ex-CHOP chief to Miami

Steven M. Altschuler, who retired in June after a 15-year tenure as CEO of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, was named senior vice president of health affairs at the University of Miami and chief executive officer of UHealth-University of Miami Health System. - Harold Brubaker

Lannett closes Kremers deal

Philadelphia-based generic drugmaker Lannett Co. said that it closed its troubled $1.23 billion purchase of Princeton-based Kremers Urban Pharmaceuticals Inc., the U.S. specialty generic pharmaceuticals subsidiary of Belgium-based UCB S.A. Before the sale was closed, Kremers told Lannett it would soon lose a key customer. - David Sell

Gamesa gets W.Va. wind farm

Spanish wind-turbine maker Gamesa, whose U.S. headquarters is in Trevose, will supply 49 turbines to the New Creek Wind Farm, a 103-megawatt project that will be built next year on a ridgeline in Grant County, W.Va. Gamesa did not disclose a price. - Andrew Maykuth

Comcast shareholders to vote

Comcast Corp. shareholders will vote on Dec. 10 whether to reclassify 347 million nonvoting K shares as regular voting common stock while preserving the Roberts family's 33 percent voting control of the cable and Internet giant. Comcast CEO Brian Roberts holds the 33 percent voting control of the company through the super-voting class B shares and will retain class B-related rights. - Bob Fernandez