YOU CAN TAKE Jenny off the block, but you can't stop the block from following her.

Jennifer Lopez and Pitbull were filming the music video for "Live it Up" on a Fort Lauderdale beach Sunday when shots rang out.

According to usmagazine.com, Lopez was being interviewed by Rob Marciano, of "Entertainment Tonight," at the time.

Marciano tweeted: "BREAKING: Gunshots fired on Fort Lauderdale beach DURING my JLo interview. No kidding. Security scrambled her away."

He tweeted soon after: "Can hear & see ambulances converging - 400 yards down the street . . . Police confirming: 'Shots fired. No one hit.' Whew."

And folks think being an embedded journalist in Afghanistan is risky.

Hill's tax penalty? Jail

Grammy-winning ex-Fugee Lauryn Hill has been sentenced to three months in prison for failing to pay about $1 million in taxes.

She was also sentenced Monday in Newark to three additional months of home confinement.

The South Orange resident pleaded guilty last year.

During a forceful statement to the judge, Hill explained that she had always meant to eventually pay the taxes but was unable to during a period of time when she dropped out of the music business.

Before the sentencing, her attorney had said that Hill had paid more than $970,000 to satisfy the state and federal tax liabilities.

Libel 101

An Iowa judge says that rocker Sammy Hagar did not defame a Playboy bunny, with whom he allegedly fathered a child, when he accused her of extortion in his memoir.

U.S. District Judge Linda Reade last week dismissed a lawsuit filed by the woman, identified as Jane Doe in court documents.

The woman claims that she and Hagar had an affair in the 1980s and that she became pregnant with his child in 1988. The child died shortly after birth in 1989.

In his 2011 memoir, "Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock," Hagar denied fathering the child and accused the woman of extorting him for money.

The problem with Doe's case was that Hagar didn't identify her. Hence, no libel.

TATTBITS

* Those pro-big government folks at the Parents Television Council are at it again, launching "#NoIndecencyFCC" Week, May 6-10, to encourage the public to file public comments to the FCC's proposal to limit broadcast indecency complaints.

They're annoyed because the FCC wants to pursue only the potentially "egregious" violations.

We guess that means that they're going to urge their congressmen to give more funding to the FCC so that it has the staffing to follow up on all of their nonsense.

Devin Copeland and Mareio Overton, two Virginia songwriters, are suing Justin Bieber and Usher for $10 million for copyright infringement.

The pair claims that Bieber's song "Somebody to Love" contains numerous lyrical and stylistic similarities to the song they wrote in 2008 by the same name.

Neither song contains any similarities to the far better 1976 Queen song "Somebody to Love" or the 1966 Jefferson Airplane song "Somebody to Love."

The duo filed their suit Thursday in federal court in Norfolk, claiming that numerous producers conspired to copy their song.

The suit says that Copeland and Overton provided a copy of their song to promoters, who in turn provided it to reps of Usher.

It became a platinum hit for Bieber in 2010.

* The Saturday night Fox television fixture "Cops" is leaving the network after 25 years.

It's moving to Spike, the cable channel aimed at young male viewers.

Fittingly, young male viewers already have the most contact with cops.

* The CBS "60 Minutes Overtime" webcast reported Monday that former President Bill Clinton was enlisted to ask British rock gods Led Zeppelin to get back together last year for the Superstorm Sandy benefit concert in NYC. They said no.

Led Zeppelin's surviving members Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and Jimmy Page were in Washington just before the Sandy concert for the Kennedy Center Honors.

Led Zeppelin last played publicly at a one-night reunion in London in 2007.

ABBA, on the other hand, hasn't played together in decades.

But a museum dedicated to the Swedish supergroup opened Tuesday in Stockholm, filled with band paraphernalia, including the helicopter featured on the cover of their "Arrival" album, a star-shaped guitar and dozens of glitzy costumes that the quartet wore at the height of their 1970s fame.

Visitors to the museum can try on costumes, record music videos and sing such hits as "Dancing Queen" and "Mamma Mia" in a studio.

(By the way, ABBA's Agnetha Faltskog has a new CD coming out this month.)

* A troupe of London street drummers got a shock Saturday when Helen Mirren emerged from a London theater to berate them for disrupting her show, "The Audience."

She was dressed as Queen Elizabeth.

Mirren told the Daily Telegraph that she used less-than-royal language in her rant.

The drummers were marching through London's West End to promote As One in the Park, a gay music festival being held later this month.

"Not much shocks you on the gay scene," parade organizer Mark McKenzie told the Telegraph. "But seeing Helen Mirren dressed as the queen cussing and swearing and making you stop your parade - that's a new one."

- Daily News wire services

contributed to this report.

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