About 10 to 15 families, according the South Philly Co-op parent Bethany Castillo Cann, met on Sunday at the site where swastikas, racist graffiti and references to Donald Trump were discovered spray painted on a storefront. The graffiti was washed off on Wednesday, but the parents at the Co-op had wanted to take action, and chose this as an appropriate place. Cann had suggested an immigration services building or another preschool before settling on Broad and Wharton.

Photographer Tammy Bradshaw met her two children, daugther Rayna, 5, and son Ember, 2, who were at the event. "I walked home on my way from work and I turned the corner and started crying, because we've been so overwhelmed," Bradshaw said.

The messages the children drew are colorful and telegraph peace. Rayna, Tammy's daughter, created a "hug spot."

Cann said the group was inspired by a story of a Tennessee family who created similar chalk art in front for the Islamic Center of Nashville.