Those of you who love the Olympics may find the reporting from Beijing this August a bit sparse.

The Chinese government has dictated a list of rules of behavior, some of which are very bad news for outsiders. The Beijing Olympic organizing committee issued a stern, nine-page document yesterday that covers 57 topics.

The guide covers everything from a ban on sleeping outdoors to the need for government permission to stage a protest. Visitors also were warned that those with "mental diseases" will be barred.

Since that eliminates most sportswriters, you'll need to find a different way to follow the Games.

T.O. cashes in. Sorry, Eagles fans, there will be no disruptive behavior in Dallas this fall.

Not, at least, from Terrell Owens.

The great but flaky wide receiver signed a three-year contract extension for about $27 million, according to the Associated Press. That guarantees peace and tranquility in Big D, at least when Jessica Simpson's not in town.

Owens is the NFL's active leader in TD receptions (129), a point of pride for a guy who was the 89th overall pick in 1996.

That draft featured Keyshawn Johnson taken first overall, with Terry Glenn, Eddie Kennison, Marvin Harrison, Eric Moulds, Amani Toomer, Muhsin Muhammad and Bobby Engram among the receivers taken before Owens.

Surf's up. Big Brown is going to attempt to win the first Triple Crown in 30 years on Saturday while running on a slightly cracked left front hoof.

His veterinarians have the situation in control, though - they're going to treat the horse as if he were a surfboard!

Hoof specialist Ian McKinlay will apply an acrylic and fiberglass patch to Big Brown's ailing hoof.

"The [acrylic] adhesive that we'll rebuild that wall with is stronger than the hoof itself," McKinlay told the AP.

Trainer Rick Dutrow Jr. said he's comfortable with McKinlay's plan, and dismissed critics who have expressed concern for Big Brown's safety.

"If he runs terrible and he's got a bleeding foot after the race, I'm sure there will be plenty of questions thrown my way," he told the wire service. "If he does what he's already been doing, maybe they'll say, 'Well, it looks like they handled it the right way.' "

This article contains information from the Associated Press.
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