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Pa. population climbs, but House loss likely

The state's census estimates in 2009 showed a modest increase in total population since 2000, but probably not enough to keep Pennsylvania's congressional seat total at 19.

The state's census estimates in 2009 showed a modest increase in total population since 2000, but probably not enough to keep Pennsylvania's congressional seat total at 19.

The state increased its population by 323,713 in that time span, according to the estimates.

Looking at the state's population figures by region, the largest growth came in the Pocono Mountain counties of Monroe and Pike, the Philadelphia suburbs, and the Lehigh Valley and the greater Gettysburg region, including York, Adams, and Lancaster Counties.

The largest losses came in Western Pennsylvania.

According to an informal study done in September by Election Data Services, a nonpartisan political consulting firm in Manassas, Va., that compiles and analyzes data on voting, elections, and redistricting, Texas would gain six seats and Florida four. Six states would gain one congressional seat: Georgia, Arizona, Nevada, South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.

Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and six other states are projected to lose one seat: Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Missouri.

Two states, New York and Ohio, are projected to lose two seats.

Jeff Brauer, a political science professor at Keystone College in La Plume, said that while the long-term ramifications were great, he doubted many people thought about redistricting when they entered the voting booth on Tuesday.

"Usually there's a lot more focus on it, but this time around it got lost in the whole national election," Brauer said.