WASHINGTON - Here is how Philadelphia-area representatives voted on major issues last week. (Senate was in recess.):

House

Debt-limit increase. Voting 97-318, the House defeated a bill (HR 1954) to raise the national-debt limit by $2.406 trillion to $16.7 trillion. The Treasury is expected to soon reach the current limit of $14.294 trillion. Republicans sponsored this bill but voted unanimously against it, saying their purpose was to show that any new borrowing authority must be joined with comparable spending cuts.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Voting yes: Robert A. Brady (D., Pa.) and Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.).

Voting no: Robert E. Andrews (D., N.J.), John Carney (D., Del.), Charles W. Dent (R., Pa.), Michael Fitzpatrick (R., Pa.), Jim Gerlach (R., Pa.), Tim Holden (D., Pa.), Frank A. LoBiondo (R., N.J.), Pat Meehan (R., Pa.), Joseph R. Pitts (R., Pa.), Jon Runyan (R., N.J.), and Christopher H. Smith (R., N.J.).

Not voting: Allyson Y. Schwartz (D., Pa.).

Homeland Security budget. Voting 231-188, the House approved a $40.6 billion Department of Homeland Security budget for fiscal 2012, down $1.1 billion or 2.6 percent from 2011. The bill (HR 2017) funds agencies such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Border Patrol, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Transportation Security Administration, and the Coast Guard. The first of the fiscal 2012 appropriations bills to pass the House, the measure reflects deep spending cuts fostered by the Republicans' 2012 budget plan.

Voting yes: Dent, Fitzpatrick, Gerlach, Holden, Meehan, Pitts, Runyan, and Smith.

Voting no: Andrews, Brady, Carney, Fattah, and LoBiondo.

Not voting: Schwartz.

Firefighters' funds. The House voted, 333-87, to add $320 million to HR 2017 (above) for antiterrorism grants used by local fire departments to fund equipment purchases and recruit and train personnel. The added spending would be offset by cuts in the Department of Homeland Security's administrative budget. The amendment would set funding for firefighters' programs at $670 million for the budget year, reversing cuts fostered by the House Republicans' 2012 budget plan.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Voting yes: Andrews, Brady, Carney, Dent, Fattah, Fitzpatrick, Gerlach, Holden, LoBiondo, Meehan, Runyan, and Smith.

Voting no: Pitts.

Not voting: Schwartz.

Mass-transit security. Voting 187-234, the House defeated a motion by Democrats to set aside $75 million in HR 2017 (above) in dedicated funding to protect intercity and commuter rail lines and bus services from terrorist attacks. Although amply funded in previous Homeland Security budgets, these transportation modes face deep cuts fostered by the GOP budget plan passed in April.

A yes vote backed the motion.

Voting yes: Andrews, Brady, Carney, Fattah, and Holden.

Voting no: Dent, Gerlach, Fitzpatrick, LoBiondo, Meehan, Pitts, Runyan, and Smith.

Not voting: Schwartz.

War Powers Act. Voting 148-265, the House defeated the tougher of two pending challenges to President Obama's addition of U.S. forces to the NATO-led air war over Libya. The measure (H Con Res 51) sought to end the action in 15 days under the 1973 War Powers Act, which authorizes presidents to deploy forces for up to 60 days without congressional approval. Obama on March 19 ordered U.S. forces to join the United Nations, NATO and Arab League effort to bolster Libyan rebels against the regime of Moammar Gadhafi. Obama has neither sought nor received congressional approval of the action but has described his policy in detail to Congress and the public.

A yes vote was backed withdrawal within 15 days of enactment.

Voting yes: Pitts.

Voting no: Andrews, Brady, Carney, Dent, Fattah, Fitzpatrick, Gerlach, Holden, LoBiondo, Meehan, Runyan, and Smith.

Not voting: Schwartz.

GOP Libya plan. Voting 268-145, the House adopted the softer of two resolutions before it concerning U.S. military actions over Libya. Introduced by Speaker John Boehner (R., Ohio), the essentially nonbinding measure (H Res 92) gives the president 14 days to justify the deployment but states no consequences if he fails to do so. A competing measure (above) sought to use the 1973 War Powers Act to force an end to the action within 15 days of enactment.

A yes vote was to back the GOP resolution.

Voting yes: Dent, Fitzpatrick, Gerlach, LoBiondo, Meehan, Pitts, Runyan, and Smith.

Voting no: Andrews, Brady, Carney, Fattah, and Holden.

Not voting: Schwartz.

This week. The House will be in recess. The Senate's legislative schedule was to be announced.