Welcome to Wednesday. You better bundle up today, and the rest of the week for that matter. Winter weather has arrived and we have a chance of snow this week, too. (Raise your hand if you're a little bit excited!)

If you like what you're reading, it's free to sign up to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. I would love to hear your thoughts, ideas, and feedback, so please email me, tweet me @aubsn, or reach our social team on Facebook.

— Aubrey Nagle

The Bridge is the only project in Philadelphia to comply with the city’s voluntary inclusionary housing program.
Inga Saffron
The Bridge is the only project in Philadelphia to comply with the city’s voluntary inclusionary housing program.

Philly's affordable housing bill has taken another step forward: yesterday it passed the City Council's Rules Committee. If passed, it will require private developers to include subsidized units for low-income tenants in new, high-density projects.

The bill heads to the full Council Jan. 25, but there is plenty of opposition. The bill has already changed quite a bit since nearly failing last week: it now largely limits the mandate to zones in Center City and University City.

Developers don't like the bill at all, and others say there are better ways to get more affordable housing in Philly. But it could produce 200 subsidized units a year.

Harvey Weinstein. Matt Lauer. Louis C.K. Kevin Spacey. Charlie Rose. All have been accused of various forms of sexual harassment, abuse, or misconduct, and all have issued public apologies (and, in some cases, denials).

What do they all have in common? Reporter Anna Orso spoke with a psychologist and a professor of linguistics to analyze 30 public statements to find out — and annotated 12 of them. (Hint: click the story's highlighted sections to read their notes.) It's fascinating stuff.

For children with intellectual or developmental disabilities, aging into adulthood comes with plenty of challenges. Finding employment once they leave school can be one of the most difficult. And, as one advocate for adults with disabilities says, "You can't talk about community integration without talking about employment."

The third part of columnist Ronnie Polaneczky's series "Falling Off the Cliff" details the difficulties adults with disabilities face finding meaningful work.

What you need to know today

We want to see what our community looks like through your eyes. Show us the park that your family walks through every weekend with the dog, the block party in your neighborhood or the historic stretch you see every morning on your commute to work.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we'll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out to build those followers!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

Dec. 6, 2017
Signe Wilkinson
Dec. 6, 2017
"Unless the president changes his mind, we can presume evangelical votes mean more to him than Kushner, fighting terror, or closing the ultimate peace deal."
— —

What we’re reading

Your Daily Dose of | Patience

Ed "Heppy" Hepworth with the binders of notes he found in the basement of AMVETS Post 146.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Ed "Heppy" Hepworth with the binders of notes he found in the basement of AMVETS Post 146.

One man sat at a Kensington veterans club bar for four decades, taking hundreds of notes on his observations. Now they've been compiled into a book.