Good morning, Philadelphia. Today we have our eyes on voting for the GOP tax bill, which will start today, and what caused the Amtrak derailment in Washington state. It'll be a relatively warm day, so it might be a good chance to finish that last-minute shopping.

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— Aubrey Nagle

Cars from an Amtrak train lay spilled onto Interstate 5 below alongside smashed vehicles as some train cars remain on the tracks above Monday, Dec. 18, 2017, in DuPont, Wash.
Elaine Thompson
Cars from an Amtrak train lay spilled onto Interstate 5 below alongside smashed vehicles as some train cars remain on the tracks above Monday, Dec. 18, 2017, in DuPont, Wash.

An Amtrak train derailed in Washington state yesterday, killing three people and injuring others. The train was running its first day on a new, faster route and traveling at 80 mph in a 30 mph zone when it derailed.

The disaster recalls Philly's own derailment in May 2015 which killed eight and injured more than 100. That crash could have been prevented had a speed control system been installed at the time. The stretch of track where yesterday's derailment occurred did not have this technology in place.

Just last month the National Transportation Safety Board found that a poor safety culture at Amtrak contributed to a deadly 2016 crash in Chester, Pennsylvania that killed two men.

Pennsylvania State Senator Daylin Leach is "taking a step back" from his congressional campaign. The announcement follows an Inquirer and Daily News report that multiple women and men claim Leach inappropriately touched female campaign staffers and subjected them to highly sexualized conversations.

Gov. Tom Wolf called for Leach to resign Sunday. Matt Goldfine, Leach's former campaign field director confirmed, "there was a pattern of behavior that I believe was totally inappropriate" on the campaign.

Leach denied any wrongdoing on Sunday and wrote yesterday in a statement, "It's heartbreaking to me that I have put someone in a position that made them feel uncomfortable or disrespected."

Over the weekend, it was revealed that special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian contact with the Trump campaign had obtained tens of thousands of emails sent and received by Trump officials. Trump's team suggested the email access was improper, though they were sought through a federal agency that stored the material.

Trump has since said he won't fire Mueller, a move which could trigger a constitutional crisis, but his lawyers are expected to press Mueller this week seeking news that the investigation into Trump is over.

However, their hunt for good news may not turn up much: Mueller's team has said they expect to be working through next year at least.

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El Rey chef Dionicio Jimenez shares his family’s traditional Mexican Christmas Eve dinner, complete with recipes. And, yes, it will make you very hungry.