If you thought we were done with election talk for a bit, you were so, so wrong. Now that all the winners have been announced it's time to see what's next and look ahead to 2018. But don't worry, we're talking about Wawa, wailing, and winter weather, too.

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— Aubrey Nagle

Democrats took two seats on the Delaware County Council on Tuesday, making inroads in a Republican-controlled county.
Michaelle Bond
Democrats took two seats on the Delaware County Council on Tuesday, making inroads in a Republican-controlled county.

Tuesday's elections were nothing short of historic. In Delaware County, Democrats made history by beating Republicans in a County Council election for the first time ever and in Chester County, Democrats won four countywide row offices for the first time since 1799. Bucks County Democrats won four of five row offices, which hadn't happened in decades.

Pennsylvania also elected an openly transgender person to office for the first time and women swept the statewide judicial races. To top it all off, a woman who ran for office after an Atlantic County Freeholder mocked the Women's March took his place on the board (maybe not historical, per se, but certainly in the Irony Hall of Fame).

But what does it all mean? Well, Republicans in Pennsylvania and New Jersey are worried that a Trump backlash has put their careers in jeopardy — and Democrats agree anti-Trump sentiment helped them win.

The success of Black Mama's Bail-Out Day, a nationwide event that raised funds to bail black women out of jail for last Mother's Day, has inspired a new initiative. Local organizers, some of whom come from groups like Media Mobilizing Project and Black Lives Matter, are launching the Philly Community Bail Fund.

As one activist says, the current system "is affecting the black community in devastating ways." The city has been exploring alternatives (New Jersey, for one, has nearly eliminated cash bail), but in the meantime organizers want to guarantee equal rights for those deemed safe to release but can't afford the cost.

And they'll have a friend in the DA's office soon enough; Larry Krasner has already spoken out against the cash bail system.

In announcing the dissolution of the state-controlled School Reform Commission, Mayor Kenney said the state hadn't been holding up its end of the deal to help the district's funding woes. Survey says: he's very, very right.

Data shows that, if funding was distributed according to need, Philly hasn't been receiving its fair share despite getting more money from the state overall. Turns out, the amount received per pupil has actually been declining, and many wealthier districts receive more.

For most of the last three decades, districts received funds based on what they got the year before. When a formula was introduced it was short-lived, and that formula is now being challenged in the state Supreme CourtKenney may not have a clear plan for funding schools just yet, but it seems the city's on the right track.

What you need to know today

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

Signe Wilkinson
"Yes, this is a "gun situation." And no, it is not too soon to talk about how to stop the carnage. "The Inquirer Editorial Board notes three problems we need to address to end gun violence.

What we’re reading

A Daily Dose of | Robots

Haverford School senior Xavier Segel (center) is pneumatically actuating a gummy candy soft robotic arm for his fellow Soft Robotic Club members (from left) Ruhao Sun, Cal Buonocore, Matthew Baumholtz, Segel, Bram Schork, Aditya Sardesai and Yiheng Chen at the school November 7, 2017. Soft robotics is a new field which constructs robots from compliant rather than rigid materials, useful especially in the medical world. CLEM MURRAY / Staff Photographer
Clem Murray
Haverford School senior Xavier Segel (center) is pneumatically actuating a gummy candy soft robotic arm for his fellow Soft Robotic Club members (from left) Ruhao Sun, Cal Buonocore, Matthew Baumholtz, Segel, Bram Schork, Aditya Sardesai and Yiheng Chen at the school November 7, 2017. Soft robotics is a new field which constructs robots from compliant rather than rigid materials, useful especially in the medical world. CLEM MURRAY / Staff Photographer

Soft robots, specifically. A team from The Haverford School just won a robotics competition for their now-patented design: a gummy-like medical device patients can swallow.