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AST WEEK we asked you about your thoughts on the mayoral race.

I'm supporting anyone BUT the people who have been in elected office for the last 15 years. They have not gotten the job done, and the streets are still dirty.

Ted Lahm, Philadelphia

As a lifelong Philadelphian, and one who takes great pride in the right to vote, I'm at a complete loss regarding next week's mayoral primary.

For me, it's not even close. Yet many are still confused as to who is the best person to lead our city. For 26 years, Rep. Dwight Evans has been serving the citizens of Pennsylvania. For 26 years, he has served the ONLY section of Philadelphia where crime has decreased. He oversees a multi-billion-dollar budget in Harrisburg. And not once in all of his years has scandal or gossip been associated with his name.

He is a man of experience, a man of honor, and a man of integrity.

Philadelphia, you have a decision to make. This is not an election about personalities. Not an election about who will say what you want to hear. This is an election about the best person to lead.

I can only pray that you care enough about your city to make the right decision. If you do, then the answer is clear: The best person for the job is Dwight Evans.

Terri Davis, Philadelphia

Several years ago, a young Duke grad, a runner and New Yorker, stood at his window at the Presidential Apartments and fell in love with the architecture of St. John the Baptist Church.

He went to Mass there and heard that their CYO track team needed a coach. A few years later, he met a Roxborough philanthropist. The young coach was complaining about the decrepit condition of the track at Roxborough High. After the philanthropist saw one of the jewels of the Philadelphia CYO track program, the Penn Relays time trials at Franklin Field, when nearly 8,000 parents, runners and friends in the stands come together, he decided to replace the shoddy track.

He contacted then-Councilman Nutter. A couple of years and many meetings later, the track was replaced with a beautiful all-weather track, with Nutter bringing together the philanthropist, school district and the city.

Al Entriken, Philadelphia

The Tom Knox reform ticket is the only way change will come about in this city, and it's been a long time coming. The old school politics is doing nothing and accomplishing less.

Tom Knox pairing with Jannie Blackwell is probably the straw that will break the camel's back in this election. Ms. Blackwell is no dummy, nor is Mr. Knox. Whatever deal they may have made is OK with me because we need radical change.

It's just amazing how City Council suddenly passed eight gun-control bills sitting on their calendar since 2004. Now that's lame. I for one will be voting for Tom Knox and anyone running for a Council seat who is not there now.

A short time ago, I re-registered as Democrat to do just that in the upcoming election and hope a lot of other folks did too if they want real change.

Gerald Jackson, Philadelphia

All we hear is how the candidates will deal with the homicides in the city, which certainly is a main priority, but one thing I have heard nothing about is how they will deal with illegal immigrants overtaking our city, as well as other cities.

Why is it we have to dedicate a page of the newspaper to be printed in Spanish regarding the elections? Is English not understandable anymore? It seems the politicians cater to all groups to not lose votes.

Frank Harte, Philadelphia

His positions on city issues and the debates make me support Michael Nutter as our next mayor. He has the leadership, people skills and temperament needed.

His other attributes are city government experience, ethical behavior and his skill as a speaker addressing the issues affecting all city residents.

The only negative I see is the smoking ban. It has flaws that need to be addressed - so repeal it and do it right. The other thing that might hurt Nutter is Tom Knox's deep pockets.

If Nutter doesn't win, he should run as an independent or - dare I say, a Republican? - as he's the best man for the job.

The others don't stack up, and business as usual doesn't cut it anymore.

Thomas G.

Lutek

Philadelphia

Rep. Chaka Fattah, in collusion with right-wing Republican Tom DeLay, voted to restore Terri Schiavo's feeding tube.

As mayor, if he attempts to reanimate neglected projects in Philadelphia, will he have to deal with more such bad guys?

Bill Paci

Philadelphia