RE JILL Porter's question (

"How Many Must Die Before Gun Lobby Gets Message?"

), the lobby's answer is strict enforcement of current law.

Ms. Porter is angered and frustrated that the career criminals responsible for Officer Liczbinski's murder broke dozens of gun laws. In response, she haplessly calls for more laws. Trouble is, the law hadn't deterred all three suspects who have a history of armed robbery, who have been in and out of prison for most of their lives, and who, according to Commissioner Charles Ramsey, "shouldn't even have been out on the street." If these recidivists had been locked up instead of paroled, Officer Liczbinski would be alive today.

John Nernoff, Philadelphia

New title: "How Many Must Die Before Criminal Justice System Gets the Message?"

Ms. Porter blamed everyone except the criminals who are shooting police. The assault-weapon ban was worthless. It did nothing to stop the manufacture or sale of "assault weapons."

What good are new laws when old laws aren't being enforced? There is a law about straw purchases. There was even an ad with the D.A. and state attorney general in it. And there are laws about felons having guns.

Paul Klein, Philadelphia

South Philly parking squad

Re Ms. Chmielowski's letter about parking on city streets during Phillies games. It's not only Hartranft, it's on all streets around the stadium, and there's a police car blocking each one.

When Commissioner Ramsey wonders why he's short of police on 80 summer nights, just look down at the stadium, where about 20 officers are assigned to block these streets, taking 20 officers off patrol to make the people of South Philadelphia happy.

What does it cost, and who pays? Not the Phillies, the taxpayer. It costs about $320,000 for the detail to block the streets for the 80 home games, another $240,000 for the traffic detail.

Here's a tip. Put up barricades and have the Parking Authority enforce the permit parking on these streets. Look at all the money they can make towing cars, and it will free up 20 officers needed to fight crime, not watch parking spaces.

Robert Stewart, Philadelphia

Dying for the right to vote

Re Larry Miller's letter on the war and voting on Election Day:

This is what hit me in the face - the last sentence: "Stay home on Election Day." Larry, on Election Day, why don't you take a train to Washington, then a cab to Arlington Cemetery and look at the white gravestones? Those young men died for your right to vote.

James A. McLaughlin, Philadelphia

Hands-off investigation

While following the Marvin Harrison shooting incident, I'm starting to realize why Philly has so many shootings. Does the D.A.'s office handle all shootings like this? Let the suspect go while the investigation is under way?

Joseph Gontz, Bensalem