Ken Venturi, who overcame dehydration to win the 1964 U.S. Open and spent 35 years in the booth for CBS Sports, died Friday afternoon. He was 82.

His son, Matt Venturi, said he died in a hospital in Rancho Mirage, Calif. Mr. Venturi had been hospitalized the last two months for a spinal infection, pneumonia, and then an intestinal infection that he could no longer fight.

Mr. Venturi died 12 days after he was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame.

Mr. Venturi was all about overcoming the odds.

A prominent amateur who grew up in San Francisco, he captured his only major in the 1964 U.S. Open at Congressional, the last year the final round was 36 holes. In oppressive heat, Mr. Venturi showed signs of dehydration and a doctor recommended he stop playing because it could be fatal. Mr. Venturi pressed on to the finish, closed with a 70 and was heard to say, "My God, I've won the U.S. Open."

He had a severe stuttering problem as a child, yet went on to become one of the familiar voices in golf broadcasting. He began working for CBS in 1968 and lasted 35 years.

Mr. Venturi played on one Ryder Cup team and was U.S. captain for the 2000 Presidents Cup team.

PGA

IRVING, Texas - Keegan Bradley shot a 1-under 69 in a round that started and ended with bogeys, good enough for a three-stroke lead after two rounds in the Byron Nelson Championship.

A day after setting the TPC Four Seasons course record with a 60, also with two bogeys, Bradley went into the weekend at 11-under 129. That is the lowest 36-hole total at the Nelson since 2001.

Tom Gillis, who shot 63 in the first group of the day off the No. 10 tee, and Sang-Moon Bae were tied for second. Bae had a 66.

Guan Tianlang, the 14-year-old amateur from China, missed the cut after shooting a 7-over 77 in the second round.

LPGA

MOBILE, Ala. - Jessica Korda shot a 7-under 65 to take a one-stroke lead over Hall of Famer Karrie Webb after the second round of the Mobile Bay LPGA Classic.