JJ Redick is in his 12th NBA season and the first-year 76ers shooting guard has seen virtually everything, but even he was taken aback by the noise level of the sellout crowd of 20,668 during Friday's 121-110 win over the Indiana Pacers at the raucous Wells Fargo Center.

Actually, it was Redick, who contributed heavily to causing the frenzied atmosphere.

He scored 31, points, hitting 8 of 12 from three-point range and personally broke a 110-110 tie by hitting three straight three's, the decibel level increasing with each made late-game shot.

"I had goosebumps tonight, I really did," Redick said after the game. "It was as loud as you'd ever seen for an NBA arena. Regular season for sure."

He described the crowd as "awesome" in the second half.

That would also be an apt description for Redick who scored 20 points after intermission, hitting 6 of 7 from beyond the arc.

"We play with energy, and we fed off that energy," said Redick, who along with the team had off from practice on Saturday. "To me the most beautiful basketball you can play is having a symbiotic relationship with the fans. It becomes beautiful. To get them that win was huge."

It was also huge for the 33-year-old Redick to have his best game with his new team.

Redick was sidelined for two recent wins in Texas over Dallas and Houston with lower back tightness. He returned for Wednesday's 119-109 win over the visiting Atlanta Hawks. In that game he scored eight points, shooting 3 of 11 from the field and 1 of 6 from beyond the arc.

Redick returned to form on Friday and missed tying his career high for three's in a game by one.

The Sixers (5-4) shot 18 of 36 from three-point range, while Indiana (5-4) was 8 for 28.

"JJ is one of the best shooters in the league, he's been doing that for a long time," Pacers coach Nate McMillan said.

Redick and Robert Covington, who was 5 for 9 from three-point range, are among the Sixers who present a real dilemma to opposing defenses.

If opponents double-team center Joel Embiid, it will open space for shooters such as Redick, who is a .415 career three-point shooter.

"The ball moving is key for us to score at a high level," said Redick, who is shooting 43.5 percent from three-point range this season. "It's just fun basketball when you're ripping around the perimeter, kicking it out to shooters, I love the way we played [Friday]."

The Sixers have been playing so unselfishly and exhibiting crisp ball movement, that they are shooting much better from beyond the arc.

In the first nine games, the Sixers are hitting 39.5 percent of their three-point attempts. Last year they shot 34 percent.

Redick is a main reason for the increase, along with the improved marksmanship of Covington, who is shooting 49.2 percent (32 for 65) from three-point range. Covington entered the season a career 35.3 three-point shooter.

Redick's presence has opened space for Covington and the other Sixers perimeter shooters.

"When he's open I try to find him," said point guard Ben Simmons, who had his second triple double of 14 points 11 rebounds and 11 assists. "It's like he hits every shot."