As you get set to watch the Women’s World Cup, here are some key games to circle on the calendar.

Click here for the full tournament schedule, including TV and streaming details for every game.

All times listed are Eastern:

United States group stage schedule

U.S. vs. Thailand

June 11, 3 p.m. at Reims (Fox, Telemundo)

The reigning champions’ quest to repeat begins with an opponent that should be easily beatable. Thailand is ranked No. 34 in FIFA’s global standings, and has won just one of its last 12 games. But that record hides a feat worth knowing: The Thais held France scoreless for an hour in late May before ultimately losing, 3-0.

U.S. vs. Chile

June 16, noon at Paris (Fox, Telemundo)

It won’t be the toughest or most important game the Americans play, but it’s likely to be one of the most memorable. The Parc des Princes, one of European soccer’s great cathedrals, awaits the world’s most glamorous women’s team — and more than 40,000 fans who will join them in the City of Lights.

The Parc des Princes in Paris is one of Europe's most famous soccer stadiums.
Francois Mori / AP
The Parc des Princes in Paris is one of Europe's most famous soccer stadiums.

U.S. vs. Sweden

June 20, 3 p.m. at Le Havre (Fox, Telemundo)

It’s been 12 years since the Americans last beat Sweden in a major tournament. It’s been three years since Sweden’s bunker-for-the-ages win in the quarterfinals of the Olympics that sent the U.S. to its earliest exit ever from a big stage. No one has forgotten. The luck of the draw — and perhaps fate — brings them together for the fifth straight World Cup. Will Jill Ellis’ team finally cast off the demons, or will the old enemy continue its hex?

Top non-U.S. games to watch

England vs. Scotland

June 9, noon at Nice (Fox, Telemundo)

England is one of the favorites to win the World Cup, but kicks off the tournament with the ultimate trap game. Scotland is the Lionesses’ eternal rival, and this is the Scots’ first women’s World Cup game. The players know each other well from clubs in England’s league, including Arsenal’s Beth Mead (England) and Kim Little (Scotland).

England's Beth Mead (right) is club teammates at Arsenal with Scotland's Kim Little.
Mike Carlson / AP
England's Beth Mead (right) is club teammates at Arsenal with Scotland's Kim Little.

Germany vs. Spain

June 12, noon at Valenciennes (Fox, Telemundo)

Germany is a perennial power, while Spain has been quietly rising in women’s soccer for a while. The rise grew loud in March when Atlético Madrid drew more than 60,000 fans for a game against Barcelona. Two months later, Barcelona reached the Champions League final. Last year, the national team beat European champion Netherlands twice and tied Germany. Now we’ll see if it can do it at the World Cup.

France vs. Norway

June 12, 3 p.m. at Nice (Fox, Universo)

Even most American women’s soccer fans know that France is a superpower, and co-favorite with the U.S. to win the World Cup. But Les Bleues have a habit of slipping up in major tournaments: They were upset by Colombia in the group stage of the 2015 World Cup, and lost to Canada in the quarterfinals of the 2016 Olympics. Although Norwegian superstar Ada Hegerberg is boycotting the national team, the rest of the squad has the defensive mettle to cause the hosts some trouble.

Amandine Henry (6) is one of France's most important midfielders. She used to play for the NWSL's Portland Thorns.
David Vincent / AP
Amandine Henry (6) is one of France's most important midfielders. She used to play for the NWSL's Portland Thorns.
Australia vs. Brazil

June 13, noon at Montpellier (Fox, Universo)

This might be the most anticipated game of the entire group stage. It’s a duel of two of the planet’s best forwards, Australia’s Sam Kerr and Brazil’s Marta. It should also be a great advertisement for the NWSL. Thirteen of Australia’s players call the league home, led by Kerr (Chicago Red Stars), fellow forward Caitlin Foord (Portland Thorns), defender Alanna Kennedy (Orlando Pride) and goalkeeper Lydia Williams (Reign FC). Brazil’s squad has four NWSL players: Marta (Orlando), forward Debinha (North Carolina Courage), midfielder Andressinha (Portland) and defender Camila (Orlando).

Jamaica vs. Italy

June 14, noon at Reims (Fox, Universo)

These are the other two teams in Brazil and Australia’s group. Since the four best third-place teams across the field’s six groups make the round of 16, the game has huge stakes. A win could be enough to advance. Italy is in the women’s World Cup for the first time since 1999. Jamaica, led by University of Tennessee product Khadija “Bunny” Shaw, qualified for the first time. Coincidentally, Jamaica’s men also played in their first (and only) World Cup in France, 21 years ago.

Khadija "Bunny" Shaw helped Jamaica qualify for its first ever Women's World Cup.
Richard W. Rodriguez / AP
Khadija "Bunny" Shaw helped Jamaica qualify for its first ever Women's World Cup.

Japan vs. England

June 19, 3 p.m. at Nice (Fox Sports 1, TelemundoDeportes.com)

The final game in Group D should determine the winner. England will be favored, as Japan is bringing a young team to prepare for hosting next year’s Olympics. But the Lionesses might have to deal with fatigue, not just the Nadeshiko’s possession style. After facing Scotland in Nice, England will travel to France’s northern coast to play Argentina in Le Havre. Then it’s back down to the south coast for this contest. At least the opponent is familiar: England beat Japan, 3-0, in the SheBelieves Cup in March.

Netherlands vs. Canada

June 20, noon at Reims (Fox, Universo)

Just how good is Canada, really? Yes, Christine Sinclair is a superstar, and there are rising stars in defenders Kadeisha Buchanan and Ashley Lawrence, midfielder Jessie Fleming and 18-year-old forward Jordyn Huitema. But is their team really the world’s fifth-best, as FIFA’s rankings say? This game will tell us. The Dutch are the reigning European champions, and have a dynamite attacking quartet in Shanice van de Sanden, Daniëlle van de Donk, Vivianne Miedema and Lieke Martens.

All televised games are also available via the networks’ websites and apps, as well as by streaming services that carry the channels. Go to FoxSports.com and TelemundoDeportes.com for more details.

Shanice van de Sanden was a breakout star in the Netherlands' run to the title at the 2017 European Championship.
Patrick Post / AP
Shanice van de Sanden was a breakout star in the Netherlands' run to the title at the 2017 European Championship.