We’re headed into the last weekend of July, with a sunny forecast that will mostly just skirt 90 degrees. Spend it singing and swaying at WXPN’s Camden music festival, featuring Elvis Costello, Blondie, Hozier, Japanese Breakfast, and more over the three-day, two-venue bash. Or buff your ride and cruise over to East Passyunk Avenue, where its yearly car show will bring wheels old and new (and beloved restaurants, too) to the shut-down stretch between Broad and Dickinson.

On a completely unrelated note, Philadelphia has 400,000 stray cats. If you live in the city, you’ve probably seen at least three of them pass through your patio or cross your street. There’s a robust network of volunteers and rescues who are trying to keep the population in check in a humane way. Here’s how they do it. — Jenn Ladd (@jrladd, jladd@inquirer.com)

A cat stands at the entrance of a trap, lured in by a few pebbles of dry food and the smell of sardines that await at the back.
Grace Dickinson / STAFF
A cat stands at the entrance of a trap, lured in by a few pebbles of dry food and the smell of sardines that await at the back.

CARS

East Passyunk Car Show and Street Festival

More than 200 vintage and custom cars roll up to this sprawling block party on South Philly’s busiest one-way. They park alongside dozens of food trucks and vendors. Live bands and circus performances are scheduled, too, and free temporary tattoo stations and a bounce house keep the kids entertained while you graze. — Grace Dickinson

11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, East Passyunk Avenue between Broad and Dickinson, 215-336-1455, visiteastpassyunk.com

DRINK

Wands & Whisky

Don your best cloak and venture to Cherry Street Pier to drift through a dark alley market with 30 artists, live music, beer and spirit samplings, and pups to pet (and adopt) from PAWS. At the center of this magic-themed festival is the Tender’s Cup, a cocktail showdown between some of the city’s best mixology wizards. All festivalgoers are invited to vote for their favorite cocktail. — G.D.

7 to 10 p.m., Tuesday, Cherry Street Pier, 121 N. Christopher Columbus Blvd., $35, artsintheindustry.ticketspice.com/wands-whisky

Watch bartenders, such as Alison Hangen, go head to head in shaking and stirring at Wands and Whisky, at Cherry Street Pier on Tuesday, July 30. (handout)
Courtesy Wands and Whisky, at Cherry Street Pier
Watch bartenders, such as Alison Hangen, go head to head in shaking and stirring at Wands and Whisky, at Cherry Street Pier on Tuesday, July 30. (handout)

FAMILY

Franklin Square Fountain Show Opening

The circular fountain set in the midst of Franklin Square’s brick pavement may not strike passersby as historic, but it’s actually over 180 years old and considered to be the oldest functioning public water fountain in the United States. Its new fountain show, two years in the making, incorporates LED lighting, synchronized pop music from various eras (Louis Armstrong, Boyz II Men, Katy Perry, to name a few), and water effects of all sorts (including geysers, swivels, and three-axis fan nozzles). The first performance kicks off at noon, followed by free carousel rides and cupcakes with Benjamin Franklin and the Phillie Phanatic. The show makes its evening debut at 8:30 p.m., with music, colonial-era lawn games, Quizzo, and more. — G.D.

11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Wednesday, 200 N. 6th St., 215-629-4026, historicphiladelphia.org

FILM

BlackStar Film Festival

Showcasing black filmmakers from around the world, this four-day celebration brings a 100-film lineup to the big screen. Highlights include the world premiere of Hip-Hop: The Songs That Shook America, a documentary series produced by Questlove and Black Thought of the Roots, as well as Roots manager Shawn Gee and director Alex Gibney (Enron, Going Clear). Programming will take place at the Institute of Contemporary Art, the Lightbox Film Center, the Leonard Pearlstein Gallery, Scribe Video Center, World Cafe Live, and the Annenberg Center for Performing Arts and the School for Education. — G.D.

Opens Thursday, with additional events through Aug. 4, multiple locations, $12 per show, $225 for a festival pass, 267-603-2755, blackstarfest.org

Questlove of the Roots debuts a six-episode documentary series about hip-hop at BlackStar Film Festival.
Photo courtesy of BlackStar Film Festival
Questlove of the Roots debuts a six-episode documentary series about hip-hop at BlackStar Film Festival.

COMEDY

First Amendment Comedy Takeover

This inaugural comedy festival spans several venues, including the Met Philadelphia, the Fillmore, Punch Line Philly, and the TLA. Designed to celebrate the power to speak without the consequence of censorship, the nine shows range from improv to live podcast recordings and traditional stand-up, with performers including YouTube stars the Try Guys and the Roots’ Black Thought. — G.D.

Friday through Sunday, multiple venues, prices vary per show, factphilly.com

THEATER

Shakespeare in Clark Park

Pack a picnic and head to Clark Park this weekend to catch a free production of King Lear, arguably Shakespeare’s finest work. In the event of rain — which would be more than appropriate for an outdoor staging of this tragedy — the production will move inside, to the Annenberg Center at 37th and Walnut Streets. — G.D.

7 p.m. Friday through Sunday, Chester Ave. and S. 43rd St., free, shakespeareinclarkpark.org

The cast of 'King Lear,' July 24-28 by Shakespeare in Clark Park.
Ann Marley
The cast of 'King Lear,' July 24-28 by Shakespeare in Clark Park.

WALKING

SilentHike

Enjoy a guided walking meditation through East Fairmount Park featuring calming, improvisational piano music. Each participant will receive a pair of wireless headphones at the start. Online registration is required. — G.D.

7 to 9 p.m., Wednesday, meeting point at 1 Boathouse Row, free, eventbrite.com/o/mindtravel-18525515166

MUSIC

XPoNential Music Festival

This year’s version of the annual fest thrown by WXPN-FM (88.5) spreads out over three days, in the open air at Wiggins Park and under the roof of the adjacent BB&T Pavilion on Camden’s Delaware River waterfront. Irish singer-songwriter Hozier headlines on Friday, rounded out by Philly’s Japanese Breakfast and Killiam Shakespeare, followed by a new wave-era double bill on Saturday led by Elvis Costello & the Imposters and Blondie. The Wiggins stage is strongest on Saturday, with Low Cut Connie, Ali Awan, Caroline Rose, Y La Bamba and J.S. Ondara, among others. — Dan DeLuca

4 p.m. Friday, noon Saturday and Sunday, Wiggins Park, 2 Riverside Dr., Camden; BB&T Pavilion, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, 856-365-1300, xpnfest.org

Elvis Costello and Blondie headline Saturday's bill at XPoNential Music Festival in Camden this weekend.
Elvis Costello and Blondie headline Saturday's bill at XPoNential Music Festival in Camden this weekend.

Hootie & the Blowfish

Back in their mid-1990s heyday, Hootie & the Blowfish never got much respect for their solid, unsurprising, middle-of-the-road rock, sung not by anyone named Hootie but by Darius Rucker, a gruff and soulful vocalist who has since managed the rare trick of becoming an African American country star. Hootie’s 1994 debut album Cracked Rear View sold over 21 million copies, qualifying it as one of the 10 biggest-selling albums of all time. This year, after a nearly decadelong layoff, the band is back with a new album on the way and a concert trek billed as the “Group Therapy Tour,” with another ’90s success story, Canadian jokesters Barenaked Ladies, opening. — D.D.

7:30 p.m., Sunday, BB&T Pavilion, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, $35-$178.25, 856-365-1300

Bruce Robison / Kelly Willis

They have been married since 1996 and, four kids later, are still making beautiful music together. Robison is a topflight songwriter whose performing style tends toward a plaintive soulfulness. Willis is a singer with a powerhouse voice she has learned to harness for more depth and a beguiling sultriness. The chemistry between this Americana couple from Texas is evident again on their new album, Beautiful Lie, which ranges effortlessly from exquisite folk-country balladry to propulsive barroom honky-tonk and roots-rock. — Nick Cristiano

7:30 p.m., Wednesday, the Locks at Sona, 4417 Main St., Manayunk, $20-$28, 484-273-0481, thelocksmusic.com

Corinne Bailey Rae plays Union Transfer Wednesday, July 31.
From the CBR website
Corinne Bailey Rae plays Union Transfer Wednesday, July 31.

Corinne Bailey Rae

Although she started out with a pop hit — “Put Your Records On” in 2006 — Corinne Bailey Rae is most comfortable blurring lines among genres. Early on, she worked with jazz greats Marcus Miller and Herbie Hancock (singing the title track on the Grammy-winning River: the Joni Letters). Since 2016’s The Heart Speaks in Whispers, her third and most recent album, she’s sung with fellow British pop singers Tracey Thorn and Richard Hawley, and with rappers Tyler, the Creator and Mick Jenkins, among others. Given that breadth, and that she’s working on a new album for next year, it will be intriguing to catch up with her on Wednesday at Union Transfer. — Steve Klinge

8:30 p.m., Wednesday, Union Transfer, 1026 Spring Garden St., $30, 215-232-2100, utphilly.com

Buckcherry

Remember when every band and every label in the ’90s sought to follow Guns N’ Roses’ drunk-druggy-rock-out-but-not-metal success story? I’m looking at you, Buckcherry. Born in Anaheim, Calif., Buckcherry’s obnoxious lead vocalist Josh Todd and guitarist Keith Nelson had GNR’s sour-and-sweet swagger down cold, but with a hint of blowsy blues and Iggy-like madness for good, rude measure. They come to the TLA on Saturday. — A.D. Amorosi

8 p.m., Saturday, Theatre of Living Arts, 334 South St., $28, tlaphilly.com