Gillian B. White, who spent part of her teenage years in Mount Holly, has joined The Philadelphia Inquirer’s board of directors, Inquirer publisher and chief executive Elizabeth H. Hughes said Tuesday.

White has worked at The Atlantic since 2014 and was promoted in July to be a managing editor from deputy editor. Her responsibilities include The Atlantic’s special projects team, its podcasts, and its editorial events group.

“The Inquirer was an important source of news growing up, and it helped inspire me to pursue a career in journalism. That is why I am particularly proud to join the board of such an important local news organization in a city I love,” White said in a news release.

White joined The Atlantic as a senior associate editor for the business section, where she covered the U.S. labor market and economic discrimination. She recently led the interview series Human Capital, which examines how work is being altered by technology and globalization.

Before joining The Atlantic, White covered economics, financial services, housing, and retail for Kiplinger and wrote a personal finance advice column for millennials. White’s work has also appeared in publications such as the New York Times, Bloomberg, and MarketWatch. She began her career as an analyst on Wall Street.

“We are thrilled to welcome Gillian to The Philadelphia Inquirer board of directors," Inquirer chairman Josh Kopelman said. “Among her many skills as a journalist, she understands the importance of reaching expanded audiences with news in ways they want it — in on their phones and through live experiences.”

White has a bachelor’s degree in economics and political science from Columbia University and a master’s in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School.

In additional to Kopelman and Hughes, The Inquirer board includes Lisa Kabnick (vice chair), Stephen J. Harmelin, S. Mitra Kalita, Keith Leaphart, Sunny Rao, Brian Tierney, Neil Vogel, and Richard Worley.

The Inquirer is owned by the nonprofit Lenfest Institute of Journalism, which has a separate board.