With their Rittenhouse barroom Tria Taproom closed to patrons, Jon Myerow and partners have repositioned it as Joyride Beef & Ale, selling a more casual menu including fried chicken sandwiches and roast beef sandwiches, along with canned craft beer, from its window on Walnut Street near 20th.

Myerow is working with chef Art Cavaliere, who owns Foghorn, a chicken shop in East Falls, as well as In Riva, an Italian restaurant off Kelly Drive.

The move may be permanent, Myerow said.

Tria Taproom at 2005 Walnut St. has become Joyride Beef & Ale, at least during the dining room shutdown.
MICHAEL KLEIN / Staff
Tria Taproom at 2005 Walnut St. has become Joyride Beef & Ale, at least during the dining room shutdown.

Before the pandemic, Myerow had been considering a new French-bar concept called Deux Chevaux for the taproom, which opened in fall 2013. Myerow said he wants to see the reception before committing to any change.

Cavaliere’s menu includes a wedge salad, three kinds of French dip sandwiches (including a vegetarian built on portabella mushroom), an Italian beef with provolone, a fried chicken “special,” which tops the chicken breast with coleslaw and Thousand Island dressing, and lemon bars, brownies, and a salted chocolate chip cherry cookie for dessert. The taproom’s vaunted beer list has yielded to 17 varieties of cans.

Meanwhile, the two Tria Cafe locations in Center City, which specialize in wine, beer, and cheese, have pivoted to takeout and delivery. The legalization of cocktails-to-go last week was a boon to Tria Cafe, whose simpler food offerings include sandwiches and cheese boards.

Italian beef sandwich topped with a long-hot pepper at Joyride Beef & Ale.
Michael Klein
Italian beef sandwich topped with a long-hot pepper at Joyride Beef & Ale.