Look at us. We’re back for a second day of The Inquirer’s daily sports newsletter after a warm reception from Philly fans. The welcome was appreciated, and it will not be forgotten.

Now, on to the content. As was the case in our first shot at this, we’ll present all the stories you care about in one place. Today, that starts with deeper analysis of the Eagles’ latest loss and shifts into the Phillies offseason, Sixers preseason, the Flyers’ tweeting season (more on that later) and finally, a whole new soccer section.

Early Birds

The Eagles wouldn’t be a 1-3 football team without issues existing on both sides of the ball. And as Jeff McLane writes, there is an imperfect fit between the scheme run by defensive coordinator Jonathan Gannon and the personnel that he has. That was shown in Sunday’s 42-30 loss to the Chiefs during which Andy Reid’s passing game and running game couldn’t be stopped. On offense, while Jalen Hurts threw for 387 yards against the Chiefs, he has been inconsistent this season. As Mike Sielski notes, Hurts has been predictably good against poor defenses and not as good against better defenses. How do the Eagles go about evaluating Hurts at a time when the clock is already ticking on the team’s commitment to him as the starter?

What’s next: After Eagles head coach Nick Sirianni offered public support to Gannon on Monday, Gannon will have his say today.

Extra Innings

Remember when the Phillies were in the playoffs? Yeah, it’s been a while — 10 years to be exact. But for all you kids out there, October was still Phillies season from 2007-11, highlighted by two trips to the World Series, including a championship in 2008. What will it take to get back to those days? It’s complicated, but Matt Breen writes that it begins with beefing up their minor league system and addressing some key holes in the roster this winter.

What’s next: Phillies president Dave Dombrowski is expected to meet with the media on Wednesday to review the season and what’s ahead this offseason.

Off the Dribble

After one of the shortest offseasons in league history, the NBA returned in earnest this week. The Sixers began their preseason schedule Monday with a 123-107 loss to the Raptors in Toronto. As many Philly fans were likely incapable of watching the game — which was available only on NBA League Pass — this might be the first you’re hearing about it. But there’s no need to worry. NBC Sports Philadelphia will broadcast 73 of the Sixers’ regular-season games, so there will be plenty time to play catch-up. These Sixers looked quite different from the team Philly fans might remember, with Ben Simmons’ holdout stretching into actual basketball games and Joel Embiid and Tobias Harris sitting out. Doc Rivers has a solution for those absences: more practice. Rivers believes the league’s preseason process could be improved — and feature fewer injuries — if training camp was longer. Something tells us his players might not share that view.

What’s next: The Sixers play the Toronto Raptors at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Wells Fargo Center in the second half of their preseason home-and-home series.

On the Fly

Flyers coach Alain Vigneault faced the media Monday after Vegas Golden Knights goalie Robin Lehner called him a “dinosaur” and accused him of treating players like “robots” in a series of tweets over the weekend. ”There’s something that was thrown out there that is completely false,” Vigneault said. “Maybe not the dinosaur part.” On the ice, the Flyers beat the Bruins, 2-1, in overtime in the first game of a preseason back-to-back. The Flyers played a mostly young lineup as they continue to experiment ahead of making roster cuts later in the week.

What’s next: The Flyers are back in action at 7 p.m. Tuesday, when they take on the New York Islanders in Bridgeport, Conn.

Fleet Street

We heard you — all you readers who love the beautiful game! Whether you’re a fervent Union fan, love the international games or even if you’re just intrigued because you’ve been watching Ted Lasso, welcome to our new soccer section. Keep up with all the latest stories with us.

The biggest story in women’s soccer today is the one involving coach sexual misconduct that has rocked the NWSL to its foundations and led to the resignation of the league commissioner, Lisa Baird. Games were canceled this past weekend and the U.S. Soccer Federation and international governing body, FIFA, both announced investigations into the league and player protections.

In MLS action, the Union continue to impress, but they’re losing a longtime staff member, Chris Albright, to rival Cincinnati.

Anyone who remembers the impact women’s soccer made in the summer of ‘99 probably fondly recalls the league that followed and existed for three years. Looking back at the Philadelphia Charge’s first season, 20 years after pro women’s soccer’s arrival here.

What’s next: The soccer games you want to watch are out there — with more options for viewing than ever. Let us help you find them.

Sports stories you should be reading

It should be no surprise that our coverage is heavy on Eagles and Sixers in early October. Oh, and don’t forget the Phillies postmortems, which have kind of become part of the lore in Philly. But we have even more to offer:

Jordan Burroughs ties American record with sixth world or Olympic wrestling title

Local NCAA student-athletes are seizing the opportunity to run with the proverbial NIL ball.

Why aren’t Peyton and Eli Manning on ESPN’s ‘Monday Night Football’ for Raiders-Chargers?