Mike Trout has spent plenty of time at Lincoln Financial Field through the years as an Eagles season-ticket holder. For a change, he will venture across Pattison Avenue.

The three-time American League MVP will play at Citizens Bank Park for the first time since 2014 when the Los Angeles Angels open a three-game series against the Phillies on Friday night. After a calf injury ruined his 2021 season, Trout is back in superstar form, among the AL leaders in home runs and slugging percentage.

The pride of Millville, N.J., Trout received a standing ovation from Phillies fans the last time he played here, and another one could be in the offing. “It was special going back there and playing and seeing how they treated me,” Trout told Scott Lauber. “I know how passionate they are. When the schedule came out, these are the three games that I circled. I love coming back and seeing everybody.”

By the way, Trout says he also loved what the Eagles did in the draft, including the big trade for A.J. Brown.

— Jim Swan, Inquirer Sports Staff, @phillysport, sports.daily@inquirer.com.

❓ Which superstar would you rather have on your team, Mike Trout or Bryce Harper? Email us back for a chance to be featured in the newsletter.

Who replaces Segura?

The Phillies will be without Jean Segura for 10-12 weeks after the second baseman broke a finger Tuesday night. How will they deal with a “difficult loss,” as manager Joe Girardi put it? He’s not exactly sure yet. A platoon is possible, but also don’t rule out a trade for a new second baseman.

Next: Mike Trout and the Angels come to Citizens Bank Park for a weekend series that begins at 6:45 p.m. Friday (NBCSP).

The Sixers don’t need to ‘star hunt’

The Golden State Warriors and Boston Celtics are almost complete opposites. The Warriors’ roster is full of veterans, while the Celtics are young upstarts. Steve Kerr has been at it for eight years with Golden State, while Ime Udoka is in his first season. And these teams also happen to play on different coasts.

But where they are similar is their roster construction, as each team decided to build through the draft rather than “star hunt.” This has become par for the course for successful teams around the league (see the Milwaukee Bucks, Memphis Grizzlies, and more) as teams like the Brooklyn Nets and Los Angeles Lakers flounder.

The Inquirer’s David Murphy believes the 76ers need to follow suit, suggesting they should stick with the approach that landed Joel Embiid and Tyrese Maxey and stay away from moves like the blockbuster trade that brought James Harden to town.

‘It’s a good tool for us’

Ever wonder what goes through the heads of front office personnel and scouts as they analyze prospects?

Giana Han talked to Flyers assistant general manager Brent Flahr and assistant to the general manager Danny Brière to get a sense of how they approach the NHL draft combine and find out which parts of the process are most important to them.

Fleet Street

You can’t help but marvel at his skill on the field.

You can’t help but grin at the good fortune of the United States team to have him on its roster.

But most of all, you can’t help but feel glad watching Yunus Musah, because his constant smile and enthusiastic nature shine through in all he does. He’s a lightbulb of positive energy on the squad.

Jonathan Tannenwald talked to Musah about what makes him tick and how the midfielder is fitting in on the USMNT.

Next: The United States takes on Uruguay, currently ranked 16th by FIFA, at 5 p.m. Sunday (FS1).

Worth a look

What you’re saying about Joe Girardi

We asked you in Thursday’s newsletter: Has the time come for the Phillies to fire Joe Girardi? If you didn’t think so earlier in the season, what precisely changed your mind?

A sampling of your responses:

“... Successful organizations begin with success at the tip of the pyramid — not the other way around. Charlie Manuel was an anomaly! He managed — doing things his way — to record the all-time number of wins for a manager, despite the dolts he reported to in the organization. ... The ownership/management of the Phillies stinks! No other way of putting it. Blunder after blunder. In a way, I feel sorry for Joe. I felt sorry for Pete. I felt really bad for Charlie. They tried their best. But when you’re constantly swimming against the tide, you get tired, and frustrated. Fire Joe, or keep Joe — mediocrity and disappointment lives on! Next man up?” — Richard S.

“... As bad as things look, they have a hundred games to play, and the expanded playoffs mean that they only may need to beat out St. Louis and Atlanta for that last Wild Card (SD and SF have the first two locked up solid). That is not much to ask, beating out two teams with even worse problems than the Phillies. The Phillies are better on paper than either of them. They need a field boss who can make that talent work. Is Larry Bowa available?” — Dick D.

“I’m somewhat disappointed in Joe at this point with some of his managing decisions. However, I’m not ready to throw in the towel. Joe doesn’t make all of the errors in the field and he is not causing injuries to his players nor is he responsible for the players hitting slump or relief pitching slump plus pure bad luck at times! Keep Joe intact for now!” I’m somewhat disappointed in Joe at this point with some of his managing decisions. However, I’m not ready to throw in the towel. Joe doesn’t make all of the errors in the field and he is not causing injuries to his players nor is he responsible for the players hitting slump or relief pitching slump plus pure bad luck at times! Keep Joe intact for now!” — Rich A.

“Joe should not go! ... Joe is a dang good manager but he can’t help the errors, the lack of hitting, the base running issues, the home runs given up and heck the only thing he can do is put 9 guys in the lineup and hope they do all the right things just play fundamental baseball.” — Steve L.

“Joe must go! The owner is looking real bad now. What is he watching that we don’t see?” — John P.

We compiled today’s newsletter using reporting from Scott Lauber, Giana Han, Ed Barkowitz, Andrea Canales, David Murphy, and Jonathan Tannenwald.