Alain Mazaud was an inquisitive child. So even after his mother trundled him upstairs, he would sneak down a step or two to peek at her and her clients at the women’s clothing boutique she ran downstairs in her family home.

”She was a woman of fashion and style,” Mazaud said of his mother. “She seemed to know everyone in the fashion business at one time, and she had customers everywhere.”

Mrs. Mazaud’s business, Linda Mazaud Boutique, first emerged from her home on Bergen Terrace in Northeast Philadelphia, near Verree and Susquehanna Roads. Later, she moved it to Philmont Avenue in Lower Moreland and finally to Second Street Pike in Southampton. It was in operation for 30 years.

“She had no training in fashion,” her son said. “She just had a way about her of knowing what to do. She had a natural love of it.”

Mrs. Mazaud, 77, died Tuesday, June 2, of COVID-19 at St. Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston, N.J.

A graduate of Northeast High School, Mrs. Mazaud was able to balance her fashion career and home life so that her children never felt deprived or ignored. There was a hot meal for him and his sister, Gabrielle, every night, and they never thought of her as anyone but their full-time mom.

“I feel blessed and full of gratitude,” her son said. “It wasn’t easy for her.”

Mrs. Mazaud (center) was close to her family and made time for them despite a busy schedule.
Courtesy of the family
Mrs. Mazaud (center) was close to her family and made time for them despite a busy schedule.

Mrs. Mazaud, then Ms. Gilper, worked at a bank for a time. She met her future husband, Bernard Mazaud, in central Philadelphia, and they married in 1973. He was from Paris and worked as a maître d’ at Le Bec-Fin. He died in 2005.

Mrs. Mazaud loved to travel and spent many days at the Jersey Shore with her friends and family. She lived near her sister and mother so the family could spend time together. She bowled at Del Ennis Lanes, and later joined the social club at her 55-over residence in Warrington and had begun to date.

During a stay in the hospital, she befriended her nurses and enjoyed being their matchmaker.

“She made friends everywhere she went,” her son said. “Family meant the most to her.”

In addition to her children, Mrs. Mazaud is survived by eight grandchildren.

Mrs. Mazaud was a natural at fashion and making friends.
Courtesy of the family
Mrs. Mazaud was a natural at fashion and making friends.

Gary Miles, gmiles@inquirer.com