Dim sum, especially the soup dumplings known as xiaolongbao, are the specialties at Dim Sum Factory, a Shanghai-style Chinese BYOB that opened last month to great crowds in Horsham.

It’s an offshoot of the Tom’s Dim Sum restaurants in Chinatown and Media. (I’ll send you here for a strange legal tale.)

The space — which was Pizzeria Felici, followed by a branch of Cantina Feliz, across the parking lot from MaGerk’s — has been redone tastefully with brick walls and greenery and carved wood light fixtures on the ceiling.

Front dining room at Dim Sum Factory in Horsham.
Michael Klein
Front dining room at Dim Sum Factory in Horsham.

You can surmise that management is treating DSF as the start of a scalable restaurant brand, as the menu is suburban-friendly, with plenty of helpful photos and fewer of the earthier dishes on the menu in Chinatown.

There’s even an explanation of how to eat the soup dumplings: “Gently lift it, move it slowly, poke a hole, suck the soup.”

The goal seems to be serving dim sum fans as well as those who crave more Americanized Chinese food. A salute to you, General Tso.

Service is cordial and brisk. The xiaolongbao tasted remarkably like those at the other Tom’s, though the tops of the dumplings on my order looked askew, suggesting the dumpling maker was fading, at the end of a busy Saturday.

Scallion pancake is a dim sum stable served at Dim Sum Factory.
Michael Klein
Scallion pancake is a dim sum stable served at Dim Sum Factory.

You can run a modest tab by ordering a bunch of dim sum, perhaps Shanghai shumai (sticky rice and pork), scallion pancakes, steamed pork buns, or crystal shrimp dumplings; or an entree or two (many noodle and rice variations with pork, beef, chicken, and seafood, all priced under $12.95); or go all in with Peking duck.

Hours: 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday.