Thousands of people took to the streets Saturday to participate in a protest over the death of George Floyd, speak out against police brutality, raise awareness about systemic racism, and support the Black Lives Matter movement. As protesters marched from the Philadelphia Museum of Art to City Hall, their passion for being heard was clear.

Here’s what they had to say:

Elliott Webster, 28, Philadelphia

Why he marched: “...To keep the momentum going. It’s happened too many times before. ... There’s something that haunts [black people]. From Michael Brown to George Floyd to Emmett Till, there’s a lineage of violence. All of this brings more attention to the issues ... to bring a closer eye to the reform we need in the criminal justice system. More than ever, people are starting to wake up.”

Andrea Konow, 70, Manayunk

Andrea Konow, 70, of Manayunk, a defender in the public defender's office, attended the protest for George Floyd at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on June 6, 2020.
Stephanie Farr
Andrea Konow, 70, of Manayunk, a defender in the public defender's office, attended the protest for George Floyd at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on June 6, 2020.

Why she marched: “This is probably the most important thing since Martin Luther King Jr. was killed. We will change. Whether we can change enough, I don’t know, but I hope we can.”

Marcel Joseph, 18, Roxborough

Marcel Joseph, 18, of Roxborough
MADDIE HANNA / Staff Photographer
Marcel Joseph, 18, of Roxborough

Why he marched: “It’s been a horrible year for me. I lost my prom, my graduation ... but it’s still important for me to make my voice heard. It’s been a horrible year for everyone. Until the people higher up make the necessary changes — until we have a policy agenda of the liberation of people of color ... maybe then we can get somewhere.”

Judy Space, 68, and Betsy Way, 67, Callowhill

Judy Space and Betsy Way came to support the protest for George Floyd at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on June 6, 2020
Vinny Vella
Judy Space and Betsy Way came to support the protest for George Floyd at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on June 6, 2020

Why Space marched: "I know I’m at risk coming out here, as an older person. But black people have been risking their lives on these streets for years.”

Why Way marched: "We have to support the young people in this movement. They have so much energy toward change, and our generation needs to help push it forward.”

Steven Thomas, 27, Southwest Philadelphia, and Brittany Rivers, 26, of Germantown

Steven Thomas, 27, of Southwest Philadelphia, and his girlfriend Brittany Rivers, 26, of Germantown.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Steven Thomas, 27, of Southwest Philadelphia, and his girlfriend Brittany Rivers, 26, of Germantown.

Why Rivers marched: “I’m tired of seeing black people killed on mass media for nothing. Black lives matter. Sign petitions, and donate money.”

Helena Miller and Dara Raspberry with Raphael, 4, and Zivah, 7, West Philadelphia

Helena Miller and Dara Raspberry with their two kids, Raphael, 4, and Ziwah, 7.
VINNY VELLA / Staff Photographer
Helena Miller and Dara Raspberry with their two kids, Raphael, 4, and Ziwah, 7.

Why they marched: “This is history,” Raspberry said. “We wanted to show them what was happening in Philly and all over the country.”

Cheryl Sesay, 24, Germantown

Cheryl Sesay, 24, Germantown.
VINNY VELLA / Staff Photographer
Cheryl Sesay, 24, Germantown.

Why she marched: Sesay had buried her grandmother on Friday. Less than 24 hours later, she was marching on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. “I came out here for her, she had a good life. I’m fighting for my people, and she would’ve loved that," she said.

Kiara Bass, 21, Cheltenham

Kiara Bass, 21, Cheltenham
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Kiara Bass, 21, Cheltenham

Why she marched: “I’m here because we live in a society that tells us that my black skin doesn’t matter as much as anyone else’s. I live in a society where black men and women are killed by the police every day and are not given justice. That’s why I’m here.”

Christopher Bowman, 27, Mount Airy

Christopher Bowman, 27, Mount Airy Philadelphia.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Christopher Bowman, 27, Mount Airy Philadelphia.

Why he marched: ”I think the most important thing is love triumphs over everything. It overpowers the hate. The lives have been lost, but they only give power to lives still here.”

Nasir Bell, 22, South Philadelphia

Nasir Bell, 22, of South Philadelphia.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Nasir Bell, 22, of South Philadelphia.

Why he marched: “The biggest thing for me is we are building a family. I’m out here making my voice heard as much as I can.” Every black life matters, he said.