Don’t be surprised to see a few snowflakes today, though we’re not expected to see any real accumulation.

Today’s top story is the fallout from comments made by Philly District Attorney Larry Krasner saying the city does not have “a crisis of crime.” Those remarks, after Philly already surpassed its annual homicide record, have generated quite a backlash.

And the empire of restaurateur Stephen Starr could be coming to a stadium, college campus, or office park cafeteria near you.

Welcome to Wednesday.

— Kerith Gabriel (@sprtswtr, morningnewsletter@inquirer.com)

Larry Krasner doesn’t feel Philly is a city in ‘crisis.’ Many beg to differ.

Comments made by District Attorney Larry Krasner about crime in the city have activists, some elected officials, and residents furious.

Krasner suggested Monday that, despite a gun violence epidemic that has claimed more than 500 lives this year, “we don’t have a crisis of crime.”

The data suggest otherwise:

It doesn’t help that Krasner spoke the same day the Temple community gathered seeking answers in the shooting death of student Samuel Collington. It’s the type of rhetoric that has many speaking out against what they see as a lack of sensitivity from the city’s chief prosecutor — with former Mayor Michael Nutter even raising the prospect that Krasner should resign.

Our reporters Mensah M. Dean, Max Marin, Dylan Purcell, and Craig R. McCoy have more on the fallout.

What you should know today

  • Latino-owned businesses in Feltonville are seeing a rash of robberies. Now they’re banding together and urging police to act.

  • The tension at school board meetings in Bucks County is so thick you can...

  • Philly deputy mayor Cynthia Figueroa is leaving her job for a return to the nonprofit sector.

  • Temple plans to build student apartments on a former industrial site, but Yorktown residents have serious concerns about what lies beneath.

  • We got a sneak peek as the Philadelphia Ballet prepares for a return of The Nutcracker to the Academy of Music after a two-year hiatus.

  • You have to check out this art installation that’s dropping knowledge of what Camden is all about.

  • The Philadelphia Union’s general manager says the club is going shopping for a bona fide forward.

  • And we’ve got a list of the 10 best stores for you sneakerheads out there.

  • Local Coronavirus Numbers: Here’s your daily look at the latest COVID-19 data.

Aramark food just got fancier, courtesy of Stephen Starr

In a match made in Philly food heaven, Aramark — and its nationwide culinary footprint inside sports and entertainment venues, universities, businesses, and more — will acquire a minority ownership stake in Stephen Starr’s restaurant empire, “sharing creative and operational knowledge.”

Some numbers from the deal:

  • 🍲 100 million: The number of people Aramark says it serves each year.

  • 🥡 15: The number of restaurants Starr has in Philadelphia alone.

  • 😋 20+: The number of Starr establishments across four states from New York to Florida, many with unique menus Aramark can select from.

  • 💰 $9 billion: Aramark’s valuation as a Fortune 500 company.

Does that mean a college or university Aramark serves might get an LMNO taco spot in its food court? It could. What about a version of Buddakan coming to an office park near you? Stay tuned.

Our food writer Michael Klein has more of the details and the possibilities from this deal.

🧠 Philly Trivia Time 🧠

Sylvester Stallone is heading back to the big screen and we have the details on his new mob drama, Kansas City, heading to the streaming outlet Paramount+. Today’s question: Considering we all know Stallone as Rocky, can you name the year the first movie in the Rocky series hit theaters? The answer and more on Stallone’s latest endeavor can be found here.

Photo of the day

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