Did you hear the story of the Philly cop who assaulted a Dunkin Donuts worker? It’s possible you did but don’t remember, since it happened in 2015.

It matters today because after this cop was reinstated, he’s back in the spotlight for another alleged assault in which his gun fell and was picked up — by a child. There’s a lot to unpack here, and our investigations team has more.

But our top story today is a look at what’s next in the pandemic as younger kids are expected to soon be eligible for COVID-19 vaccines. We break down everything you need to know, from which vaccine kids could get to doubling up with a flu shot. Have a question for our health reporters? Email them.

My first week of having this daily conversation with Philly is in the books. So far? So fun.

— Kerith Gabriel (@sprtswtr, morningnewsletter@inquirer.com)

What to know about vaccines for kids

Which vaccines will be authorized for kids? Who will be eligible? How soon? These are all questions that parents around the region are asking as the White House plans to vaccinate 28 million children age 5 to 11 as soon as possible.

The most important question: Why should kids get vaccinated?

The answer: Vaccines remain highly effective at preventing hospitalization and death. While it’s true most children experience only mild symptoms, hundreds have died from the disease in the U.S., and thousands have been hospitalized. And children who get vaccinated will be far less likely to transmit the virus to older people.

Our reporters Jason Laughlin and Tom Avril answer all your questions.

Philly’s top cop says police tactics are slowing shootings in some neighborhoods. But they’re still high citywide

Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw has been touting what she calls “wins” in her department’s efforts to reduce gun violence, highlighting decreases in a handful of police districts.

And she’s right. Year-over-year, shootings have declined in certain neighborhoods, including in parts of Fishtown, South Philly, and the Northwest.

But shootings are still on the rise citywide. Check it out:

Do you consider this a little victory against gun violence? Tell us.

What you should know

Through your eyes | #OurPhilly

When it comes to would-be package thieves, this Philly cat wants all the smoke. Good eye, @gerardrunsphilly. Have a shot you’d like to share? Tag us using #OurPhilly.

That’s interesting

🚗 All city government cars are going fully electric after 2030, ending the cycle of gas-powered rides for a fleet of 5,500 vehicles.

🏠 Home prices are rising higher than what people can save for a down payment. But there are a number of options to consider if you’re in the market.

🌳 There’s a proposal to make the Delaware River Water Gap the region’s first national park.

Opinions

“Concerned Black Philadelphians are often pitted against lofty-minded activists, further perpetuating the misunderstanding of the complexity of our community. … Philadelphia’s leaders should spend more time talking to Black people who are impacted by this violence. Additionally, we need specific resources to cope until the violence has been stemmed,” writes local organizer Abdul-Aliy Muhammad, who suggests that instead of catchy slogans, the city needs concrete strategies if our Black communities are to effectively deal with gun violence.

  • Artist Mary Enoch Elizabeth Baxter wants to have a conversation about the legacy of artist Thomas Eakins, who alongside his renowned works had a history of serious sexual improprieties.

  • And Michelle Ross and Donna Bryne write that it’s time for anti-discrimination protections for older LGBTQ community members.

What we’re...

  • In love with: This story about how the Girl Scouts allowed a 15-year-old girl and the service dog she’s training to attend summer camp together, and invaluable life lessons that ensued.

  • Suggesting for the weekend: That you take a stab at one or more of these Halloween jawns throughout the region. Halloween not your thing? That’s OK, there’s tons more to consider, courtesy of our Things to Do roundup.

  • Keeping our 👀 on: What voters in Lehigh County decide next month regarding changing the county’s official language from English, considering that more than half of its residents identify as Hispanic.

Photo of the day

Enjoy your weekend, everyone. I’ll get at you Monday, bright and early.