How many major food groups can you fit under one (large) roof?

Token, a fast-casual operation in Northern Liberties, has Korean-style cooking (bowls, bao, dumplings, and double-fried wings); old-fashioned American baked goods made on premises; coffee and espresso drinks; shakes and ice cream; and bottles of beer to go.

Token (1050 N. Hancock St., 215-858-2288) recently replaced a shoe store next to the stage at the Schmidt's Commons (the former Piazza at Schmidt's).

The savory side of Token's menu features bowls - beef, chicken, or spicy chicken bulgogi or pan-fried tofu that top japchae (sweet potato starch noodles), rice, or salad. Also available are pillowy steamed bao that can be filled with the same choice of proteins.

Each bowl is served with a mandoo, a thin-crusted meat dumpling. Sides include fresh (not fermented) kimchi: geot-jeori (cabbage) and oi (cucumber).

The double-fried chicken, which is properly thick-breaded but less crunchy than most of its competitors, is offered with one vinegar-based sauce that is moderately spicy.

Tim Lu, a partner in Crabby Cafe, the sports bar next door, is a partner with his brother Jason; Yun No, an IT professional; and Tom McMackin, a contractor.

McMackin comes in on the sweet side. He briefly owned Wagner's Bakery in Huntingdon Valley, and has all the recipes for cookies, cakes, pies, and sweet rolls.

Hours are 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Friday and Saturday, and 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday.