For those planning to drive out of town Wednesday, fellow motorists are likely to cause bigger headaches than the weather, which doesn’t look bad at all. But a potential storm could complicate the trips home, and gusty winds might be an issue for the Thanksgiving Parade.

Gale-force gusts are possible Thursday during the parade, which begins at 8:30 a.m. at 20th Street and John F. Kennedy Boulevard. In short, it will be tough day to be a parade inflatable.

“Forty to 45 [mph] is almost a given,” said Dave Dombek, a meteorologist with AccuWeather Inc. He said that the wind scenario has been in place since last week, thus arguing against the computer models’ backing off on the forecast.

Dombek said that from the surface up to several thousand feet in the atmosphere, the winds are forecast to be blowing from the same direction — primarily from the west, or across the Parkway more or less from the Schuylkill. “It’s pretty well aligned,” he said.

But no rain is in the forecast for Thursday, and temperatures will be in the tolerable 40s at parade time; parade veterans have endured far worse.

And Wednesday, always one of the busiest of the year on the nation’s highways, should be at the very least a half-decent travel day, with just a chance of showers, and temperatures making a run at 60. But winds will pick up during the afternoon.

The warm air will rush north ahead of a storm aiming for the Great Lakes and then turn eastward. After the storm drags a front through the region, winds will pick up as the storm interacts with higher pressure building in from the west.

Friday and Saturday highs will be in the December-like 40s, and that’s excusable given that Sunday is Dec. 1.

A significant coastal storm could affect the region late Saturday into Monday, with rain mixed with snow at times, although the forecast is likely to undergo multiple changes between now and when the first drops, or flakes, appear.

A pattern in the north Atlantic Ocean that favors cold and storminess is forecast to take hold for several days, and the government’s 8- to 14-day outlook has odds favoring below-normal temperatures and above-normal precipitation.

Said Dean Iovino, a lead meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Mount Holly, “Winter’s coming.”