The weekend forecast is gorgeous and your weekly dose of the Eagles is happily fulfilled, so why not get out? We dedicated this week’s edition of the Things to Do newsletter to the great outdoors: Reporter Jason Nark, who spends a lot of time roaming the wilds of Pennsylvania, suggests five great fall hikes near and far from Philadelphia; Bethany Ao signed up for free fly fishing classes at Orvis, then tested her skills in Berks County; and Grace Dickinson explored how to upgrade camping food — whether you’re basic or Bear Grylls. (Relatedly, Mari Schaefer outlines how to spot and kill the spotted lanterfly and its spawn, the invasive species killing Pennsylvania trees.)

Jenn Ladd (@jrladd, jladd@inquirer.com)

David Kim, takes part on a flying fishing class offered by Orvis at Fenimore Park in Wayne, Pa. Sunday, June 30, 2019
JOSE F. MORENO / Staff Photographer
David Kim, takes part on a flying fishing class offered by Orvis at Fenimore Park in Wayne, Pa. Sunday, June 30, 2019

PARADES

Spit Spreads Death Parade

The front page of the Sept. 28, 1918, issue of The Philadelphia Inquirer encouraged marchers and onlookers to join together in song at that day’s Liberty Loan parade, which inadvertently spread a virulent strain of the flu throughout the city. After six months, the death toll had reached 20,000 in Philly; in time, the worldwide death rate climbed to more than 50 million. The forthcoming Mutter Museum’s Spit Spreads Death exhibition (launching Oct. 17) and its corresponding “performance art parade,” marching up Broad Street on Saturday, aim to memorialize the tragic event. Led by British art collective Blast Theory — who will film the event for use in the exhibition — the parade will use songs, glowing floats, and cell phone screens to pay tribute to the 751 Philadelphians who died on Oct. 12, the pandemic’s deadliest day. Members of the public are welcome to join in (sign up at spitspreadsdeath.com) but please, if you’re not feeling well, stay home. — Patrick Rapa

5 p.m., Saturday, starts at Marconi Plaza, 2800 S. Broad St., and ends at Dilworth Park, 1 S. 15th St., free, 215-560-8564, spitspreadsdeath.com

Puerto Rican Day Parade

Philly’s largest outdoor celebration of Puerto Rican and Latino heritage observes more than 50 years of existence. Hundreds of dancers and performers march up the Parkway, then keep the good times going post-parade with a festival at American Street and Lehigh Avenue. — Bethany Ao

Noon to 3 p.m., Sunday, 16th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway, free, 215-627-3100, elconcilio.net

The annual Puerto Rican Day Parade on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway on Sunday, September 28, 2014. (Serge Levin / Philly.com)
The annual Puerto Rican Day Parade on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway on Sunday, September 28, 2014. (Serge Levin / Philly.com)

FAMILY

Pops Goes to Hollywood: From Raiders to Gotham

Not every Philly Pops concert takes aim at the youthful set, but this one is for the grandkids — provided they’re old enough to watch PG movies and young enough to be cool with wearing superhero costumes into the Kimmel. Todd Ellison conducts pieces from the scores of Black Panther, Avengers, Wonder Woman, Jurassic Park, Star Wars, and more. — Lauren McCutcheon

Sept. 27-29, Kimmel Center’s Verizon Hall, 300 S. Broad St., $35 and up, 215-893-1999, phillypops.org

The Philly Pops play hits from popular movie scores.
The Philly Pops play hits from popular movie scores.

BEER

Sly Fox Brewery’s annual Can Jam

Watch more than 150 teams compete at KanJam — the backyard game where you basically toss Frisbees into a collapsible trash can from a distance — at this annual tournament-meets-beer festival. After the disc-throwing kicks off (11 a.m.), look forward to live music, Sly Fox beer, and filling fare like pizza, cheesesteaks, pretzels, veggie sandwiches, and brats. — Grace Dickinson

10 a.m. Saturday, Sly Fox Brewery, 331 Circle of Progress Dr., Pottstown, free, slyfoxbeer.com/canjam

EARLY HALLOWEEN

2nd Sanctuary

Choreographer Brian Sanders and his longtime dance troupe, JUNK, debut a Halloween work on Oct. 3 — 2nd Sanctuary, a five-part choose-your-own-adventure experience. There’s a maze, an escape room, a virtual-reality experience, and of course plenty of dance and humor, all with a ’70s theme in a former Victorian-era church in Graduate Hospital. Tickets are sold separately for each of three segments; the maze and a zombie disco are free and open to the public. JUNK has suggested a PG-13 rating for these events.

Opens Thursday, JUNK, 2040 Christian St., $29-$35, 267-406-6080, briansandersjunk.com

A previous Brian Sanders' JUNK production, 'Dancing Dead IPX.' His latest work, '2nd Sanctuary,' is a five-part choose-your-own-adventure production.
TED LIEVERMAN
A previous Brian Sanders' JUNK production, 'Dancing Dead IPX.' His latest work, '2nd Sanctuary,' is a five-part choose-your-own-adventure production.

DANCE

‘Dance Me’ / Music of Leonard Cohen

The Canadian troupe Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal brings this homage to the songwriting great to the Annenberg Center this weekend. The program features three choreographers: Annabelle Lopez Ochoa (who choreographed this summer’s hit The Little Prince for BalletX), Andonis Foniadakis, and Ihsan Rustem. — Ellen Dunkel

8 p.m., Friday, also 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, 3680 Walnut St., $29-$79, 215-898-3900, AnnenbergCenter.org

WRITING

MightyFest

Philadelphia nonprofit Mighty Writers puts on this four-day writing festival, featuring workshops geared toward youth of all ages, a Saturday morning literacy carnival (think writing games) at Aviator Park in front of the Franklin Institute, and a talk from keynote speaker Michael Barbaro, host of New York Times’ podcast The Daily, on Saturday at 7 p.m. Barbaro will discuss the pressures of deadline production, the current state of journalism, and life at the Times at the Trinity Center for Urban Life, at 2212 Spruce St. — G.D.

Through Sunday, various times, locations, and prices (some free), 267-239-0899, mightywriters.org

This weekend's MightyFest, from Philly nonprofit Mighty Writers, is back for a second year.
Handout
This weekend's MightyFest, from Philly nonprofit Mighty Writers, is back for a second year.

MUSIC

Whitney / Hand Habits

A well-matched double bill of Americana-leaning indie bands that put a smooth, attractive surface over an undercurrent of tension. Headlining is Whitney, the Chicago outfit that is the creative outlet for singer-guitarist Max Kakacek and singer-drummer Julien Ehrlich. The melodically inviting sounds on their new album, Forever Turned Around, are so sweet and easygoing, it qualifies as a rootsy subgenre of yacht rock. Hand Habits is guitarist Meg Duffy, whose Placeholder has a bit more of an edge, with incipient panic detectable upon close listening and outwardly placid songs like “Can’t Calm Down.” — D.D.

8 p.m., Friday, Union Transfer, 1026 Spring Garden St., $27, 215-232-2100, utphilly.com

Brittany Howard

The extent to which Alabama Shakes singer Brittany Howard’s new album, Jaime, is a complete reinvention has been exaggerated. Yes, it’s a bold breakdown and imaginative reshaping of classic soul and R&B stylings, but so was Shakes’ 2015 album Sound & Color. Which isn’t to say that Jaime — which is named after Howard’s late sister, who died of eye cancer at age 13 — isn’t entirely fabulous. It is. And if you didn’t already know that Howard is a vocalist of staggering range and authority, the evidence is all over the 11-song set, from the fluttery delicacy of the Curtis Mayfield-worthy “Stay High” to the welcoming wail of the closing “Run To Me.” Definitely an album-of-the-year candidate. — Dan DeLuca

8 p.m., Friday, the Fillmore Philadelphia, 29 E. Allen St., $45, 25-309-0150, fillmorephilly.com

Brittany Howard of Alabama Shakes comes to town Friday, to tour for her newly released solo album, 'Jaime.'
Amy Harris / Amy Harris/Invision/AP
Brittany Howard of Alabama Shakes comes to town Friday, to tour for her newly released solo album, 'Jaime.'

J Balvin

Inspired as much by smooth salsa crooner Hector Lavoe as he is by rough reggaeton king Daddy Yankee — add in the electronic experimentalism of Bjork for good measure — Medellín, Colombia-born, American-raised J Balvin is Latin music’s most explosive new personality. Tying reggaeton, trap, house, and R&B into a knotted groove and topping it with Spanish-language soul has given us dynamic recordings such as 2018’s Vibras as well as Oasis, 2019’s pairing with LatinX’s other forward-thinking singer/rapper, Bad Bunny. — A.D. Amorosi

8 p.m., Friday, the Borgata, 1 Borgata Way, Atlantic City, N.J., $149-$69, theborgata.com

Kaki King

Kaki King treats her guitars like machines built for exploration and discovery. She’ll tap strings, doctor them with devices, use them as a percussion boards or as triggers for light shows. Her performances are a blend of thoughtful songs, inventive improvisations, and technical wizardry. She’s playing only a handful of shows as she works on a new album, so it’s hard to predict what’s in store when she comes to the intimate Arden Gild Hall just south of the Pa. line in Arden, Del., on Friday. But she’s sure to dazzle. — Steve Klinge

8 p.m., Friday, Arden Gild Hall, 2126 the Highway, Arden, Del., $25, 302-475-3126, ardenconcerts.com

Kaki King plays the Arden in Delaware on Friday, Sept. 27.
Sham Hinchey & Marzia Messina
Kaki King plays the Arden in Delaware on Friday, Sept. 27.

Frankie Cosmos

Observations, relationships, songs — everything is short and sharp in the world of Frankie Cosmos, the New York band led by Greta Kline. The new Close It Quietly, the fourth Frankie Cosmos album (in addition to many Bandcamp releases), contains 21 songs, most of them under 90 seconds (“Wannago,” the longest, is an epic 3:19). But they’re not fragments: they’re succinct declarations about self-discovery, often hinging on a moment fraught with meaning. Kline has a light, singsong voice, and even though this album sounds fuller and tighter than past ones, it still has a homespun, inviting quality. The band instead plays an all-ages midafternoon show Saturday at Boot & Saddle, moved from an evening show at PhilaMOCA, which is shut down for the time being. — S.K.

2:15 p.m., Saturday, Boot & Saddle, 1131 S. Broad St., sold out, 267-639-4528, bootandsaddlephilly.com

Brian Wilson and the Zombies

For the Something Great From ’68 tour, these two luminaries will celebrate the 51st anniversary of that momentous year. The Zombies — led by Rod Argent and Colin Blunstone — will perform in its entirety their album Odessey & Oracle, which was greeted with indifference upon release and has more recently come to be regarded as a masterpiece. Wilson will be concentrating on songs from the Beach Boys 1968 release Friends (the band’s brief, becalmed “Maharishi album”) and also (for reasons that are not chronologically consistent or clear) 1971’s Surf’s Up, a more typically energetic effort that includes the masterpiece “Til I Die.” Wilson postponed numerous shows earlier this year after he said he was feeling “mentally insecure” after three back surgeries, but he’s been on the road without incident all this month. — D.D.

8 p.m., Saturday, the Tower Theater, 69th and Ludlow Streets, Upper Darby, $69-$89, 610-352-2887, thetowerphilly.com

Beach Boys co-founder Brian Wilson is at the Tower Theater on Saturday, Sept. 28.
Luis Sinco / MCT
Beach Boys co-founder Brian Wilson is at the Tower Theater on Saturday, Sept. 28.

The Hot Sardines

With a recently released live album (Welcome Home, Bon Voyage) under the group’s belt, the secret is out for those who haven’t witnessed them in the past: The Hot Sardines is Canada’s best and most effervescent live band. A hot jazz/swing ensemble with the propulsion of a power trio and the rhythmic twists of an Astor Piazzolla, the eight-piece band, coled by singer Elizabeth Bougerol and pianist Evan Palazzo, can move through bawdy vaudeville numbers (“Some of These Days”) and delicate ballads (“Exactly like You”) seamlessly and soulfully. — A.D.A.

8 and 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday, Chris’ Jazz Café, 1421 Sansom St., $40, chrisjazzcafe.com

Nick Millevoi’s ‘Streets of Philadelphia’

In recent years Nick Millevoi has joined the ranks of musicians enlisted to perform the ever-growing books of compositions by the prolific, eclectic John Zorn. (In Millevoi’s case, the Bagatelles, the daintier cousin to Zorn’s Masada magnum opus.) Perhaps taking inspiration from that experience, the Philly guitarist is publishing his own book of tunes with a hometown twist. On Friday, he’ll launch “Streets of Philadelphia,” a set of single-page compositions inspired by local thoroughfares, at the first in a series of performances. The kickoff features a double bill, with Millevoi’s Desertion Trio as well as a specially assembled chamber ensemble. — Shaun Brady

8 p.m., Friday, Pageant: Soloveev, 607 Bainbridge St., $15, 215-925-1535, pageantsoloveev.com

World Cafe Live celebrates its 15th anniversary next week.
World Cafe Live celebrates its 15th anniversary next week.

World Cafe Live 15th Birthday Bash

The two-tiered University City club opened its doors in 2004. It celebrates a decade and a half in business with a Tuesday night show featuring local acts New Sound Brass and Martha Stuckey. There are happening shows all that week, with Lucinda Williams on Oct. 1, Sonny Landreth on Oct. 3, James Poyser of the Roots’ Future Sounds X jam session on Oct. 4, and JD McPherson and Stereo League on Oct. 6. — Dan DeLuca

8 p.m., Wednesday, World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St., free with RSVP, 215-222-1400, worldcafelive.com