It’s Giving Tuesday, and Philly groups could use your support. Whether you want to help the hungry, help newcomers to this city, or give to another deserving group, there are many options to choose from.

We’ve compiled a list of some good local places to start. But there is no shortage of charities across the city and the country working to help those who need it. Choosing one — or a few — to support may take some thought. A good place to start is Charity Navigator, which evaluates nonprofits and recommends credible organizations.

Here are Philly-area causes to consider:

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Help the hungry

  • Philabundance: Money donated to Philabundance will help create and distribute emergency food boxes for community members in the nine Philadelphia-area counties the organization serves.

  • The Sunday Love Project: Founder Margaux Murphy’s Sunday Love Project is working to feed hungry Philadelphians, with a focus currently on Kensington, and is accepting financial donations to help with their efforts.

  • Narberth Community Food Bank: Like other area food organizations, Montgomery County’s Narberth Community Food Bank is seeking financial donations to assist with additional service hours and days, as well as the purchase of additional equipment and other expenses.

  • Everybody Eats Philly. Headed up by a group of local chefs, this initiative fights food insecurity and builds community with regularly scheduled grocery giveaways (including essentials like toiletries and paper towels) for folks in need around the city.

  • MANNA brings food and aid to people at acute nutritional risk from life-threatening diseases. The group is always looking for volunteers, including working in the kitchen or delivering meals to homes. Proof of COVID-19 vaccination is required for all volunteers. You can also make a one-time or recurring donation to MANNA if you’d like to help pay for meals instead.

  • St. Francis Inn Soup Kitchen. This Kensington soup kitchen serves meals to people experiencing homelessness, and needs volunteers and donations around the holidays. If you can’t donate your time, consider checking out the group’s Amazon wish list, which includes items like underwear, diapers, toothpaste, and more.

  • Broad Street Ministry Since 2005, the Broad Street Ministry has been providing services to those in need. Sign up to volunteer, or you can also donate online.

  • The Share Food Program delivers food to more than 1 million people in the region, directly to their homes, each month. Share accepts donations online.

  • Donate to a community fridge near you.

» READ MORE: Where to find 30+ community fridges in Philadelphia

Help vulnerable groups

  • The Philadelphia Corporation for Aging: The PCA is the Philadelphia area’s official agency on aging and is working to assist elderly Philadelphians during the coronavirus pandemic through efforts such as the Rodney D. Williams Philadelphia Fund for Seniors and the Emergency Fund for Older Philadelphians.

  • Project HOME works to “empower adults, children, and families to break the cycle of homelessness and poverty, to alleviate the underlying causes of poverty, and to enable all of us to attain our fullest potential as individuals and as members of the broader society.”

  • Project SAFE: Founded in Philly in 2004, Project SAFE works to provide “women and femme-centered services with a focus on women working and living in the street economies in Kensington,” the group says online.

  • The Salvation Army: The Eastern Pennsylvania & Delaware Division of the Salvation Army works to support at-risk groups such as children, vulnerable adults, and other “hurting people throughout Pennsylvania and Delaware,” the group says online.

  • Habitat for Humanity Philadelphia helps build housing for those who need it; to date, the group has built 240 homes and repaired nearly 700 in Philly. This year, the group is trying to reach 250 donors in 24 hours, after which, a group of anonymous donors has pledged $10,000 in additional funding.

  • One Warm Coat provides free coats to children and adults who need them.

  • Philadelphia Community Bail Fund posts bail for Philadelphians who cannot afford it. They are also working to end cash bail in Philadelphia.

  • Why Not Prosper helps women released from the prison system get housing, find employment, reconnect with their children, stay away from drugs and alcohol, and stay out of the prison system.

  • Mary’s Daughter for the Formerly Incarcerated advocates for and supports Black women, non-binary people, and trans people who are either formerly or currently incarcerated.

  • Anti-Violence Partnership of Philadelphia provides victims of violence with counseling, support, and services to help reduce the cycle of violence in the community.

  • Community of Legal Services Philadelphia provides free civil legal assistance to Philadelphians and “assists clients when they face the threat of losing their homes, incomes, health care, and even their families.”

» READ MORE: Donate your coats, hats, scarves and mitts to help keep someone warm.

Help new Philadelphians

Help people affected by gun violence

  • Moms Bonded By Grief helps support kids who have lost parents due to gun violence. The group accepts donations at 1920 S. 20th St., Phila, PA 19145 or cash app $MBBG2017

  • The Donte Wylie Foundation works to provide “a safe space for survivors of violence, individuals who caused harm, and community members to collectively heal and explore workable solutions to reduce gun violence.” Donate via the group’s website or through The Donte Wylie Foundation, P.O. Box 20130, Philadelphia PA, 19145

  • Northwest Victim Services supports victims of crime and their families in Northwest Philadelphia.

  • EMIR Healing Center provides support to families and friends who have lost a loved one to homicide.

Help support youth

  • The Monkey and the Elephant cafe in Brewerytown is accepting donations for their Employment Training Program. It’s a year long employment training program for youth aging out of the foster care system.

  • Valley Youth House helps youth “achieve their desired future through genuine relationships that support families, ensure safe places, and build community connections.”

  • Covenant House “provides housing and supportive services to youth facing homelessness.”

  • YSI Philly “provides immediate shelter and support services to children, youth and families, YSI offers unique programs and niche services throughout the city, including Philadelphia’s only Crisis Nursery program and the longest standing shelter for runaway and homeless teens.”

  • Mighty Writers is a literacy group that helps kids learn to write and think with clarity.

  • Eastern State Penitentiary annually teams up with local groups to organize a holiday gift drive for children who have a parent who is either currently incarcerated or was recently incarcerated. You can donate a new, unwrapped toy or book through Dec. 22 by dropping the gift off during open hours or having the gift shipped directly to the Fairmount attraction. Those who donate a gift get buy one get one admission to a daytime tour at the museum through Dec. 31, 2022.

  • YEAH Philly provides teens with a safe space and helps teens address and stop the “cycle of youth community violence in West and Southwest Philadelphia neighborhoods.”

  • Philadelphia Anti-Drug/Anti-Violence Network addresses drug abuse and violence in teens by providing support to youth and their families.

  • NoMo Foundation provides children, K-12, with information about healthy lifestyle choices.

  • Institute for the Development of African American Youth supports local teens and children by providing them with educational, cultural, intervention, and intervention programs to help reduce violence in communities.

  • 100 Black Men of Philadelphia aims to “improve the quality of life within our communities and enhance educational and economic opportunities for all African Americans.”

Help support families with young children

If you can’t donate money

Can’t afford to give money this year? You can volunteer your time, or donate goods to one of these groups.