TL;DR: Philadelphia officials are considering banning indoor dining; requiring office employees to work remotely if possible; and shutting down gyms, youth and community sports, and theaters, according to people briefed on a potential plan Friday. Read more here. More than 2,000 nurses across three hospitals in the Philadelphia region voted to authorize a strike as they negotiate with their employers over staffing levels.

— Ellie Silverman (@esilverman11, health@inquirer.com)

What you need to know:

🏥 As coronavirus cases surge, Philadelphia-area hospitals waver between sounding alarms and reassuring the public.

📚 The Montgomery County Board of Health on Friday ordered all K-12 schools to revert to all-virtual learning for two weeks beginning Nov. 23, a mandate officials said would prevent “a significantly worse situation post-Thanksgiving holiday.”

📈 Newark, N.J., has enacted tougher restrictions as its positivity rate surpassed 19%. The restrictions include halting all team sports for at least two weeks and limiting indoor gatherings to 10 people until at least Dec. 1.

😷 President Donald Trump touted progress toward a vaccine and said he would not order a national lockdown “under any circumstance.”

💰 Coronavirus stimulus checks could be on their way to about 64,000 Philly households if they act now.

🧻 Philly-area grocery stores are starting to put purchasing limits on products again.

📰 What’s going on in your county or neighborhood? We organized recent coverage of the coronavirus pandemic by local counties and Philly neighborhoods mentioned in the stories to make it easier for you to find the info you care about.

Local coronavirus cases

📈 The coronavirus has swept across the Philadelphia region and cases continue to mount. The Inquirer and Spotlight PA are compiling geographic data on tests conducted, cases confirmed, and deaths caused by the virus. Track the spread here.

Mayor Jim Kenney’s administration is considering banning indoor dining; requiring office employees to work remotely if possible; and shutting down gyms, youth and community sports, and theaters, according to people briefed on a potential plan Friday. The potential restrictions, my colleagues Laura McCrystal, Michael Klein, and Craig LaBan report, would also limit outdoor dining to only members of the same household, and up to four people per table. A city spokesperson said the potential restrictions have not been finalized. Read more here.

More than 2,000 nurses across three hospitals in the Philadelphia region voted to authorize a strike if their employers wouldn’t commit to limits on how many patients a nurse could be assigned during a shift, among other issues. “Some of us were taking three patients at a time when we should never have more than two,” Chelsea Rabena, a surgical and trauma ICU nurse at Einstein, said of her time working during the pandemic. “And sometimes these patients, they’re so sick, they’re meant to have one nurse.” Read more here.

Helpful resources

You got this: Stay safe, do stuff

Here is one highlight from our weekly events calendar:

🎨 Philadelphia Chalk Festival (Fall event / in-person / kid-friendly / outdoors): Take a stroll through Kensington and Fishtown on Saturday and find beautiful street art outside of venues, restaurants, and attractions for the one-day Philadelphia Chalk Festival. The festival map shows attendees where to find the impressive artworks on their socially distant and self-guided tour. (Free, Nov. 14, phillychalkfest.com, map, add to calendar)

Have a social distancing tip or question to share? Let us know at health@inquirer.com and your input might be featured in a future edition of this newsletter.

What we’re paying attention to

  • From ProPublica: “The Enraging Deja Vu of a Third Coronavirus Wave”
  • A coronavirus outbreak tied to a wedding reception in rural Maine led to 177 infections and seven deaths, illustrating the high risk posed by people gathering for the upcoming holidays, the Los Angeles Times reports.
  • Almost all of the 16 Republican governors who oppose statewide mask mandates told POLITICO or said in public statements that they are ready to reject any pleas from President-elect Joe Biden to impose the public health measure.

Enjoy getting our journalism through email? You can also sign up for The Inquirer Morning Newsletter to get the latest news, features, investigations and more sent straight to your inbox each morning Sunday-Friday. Sign up here.