Are you satisfied with your salary? Do you like the people you work with? Would you be better off making more but just tolerating you co-workers, or are you happy heading in to work every day despite what it says on your paystub?

As it turns out, most people are happy with their colleagues, regardless of their current pay.

Monster, in conjunction with the WageIndicator Foundation, surveyed workers in the United States and Europe to find out how satisfied they were with their wages and other aspects of their workplaces.

Less than half of the respondents in the United States, United Kingdom and Spain are happy with their wages (only in Germany were more than half the respondents happy with their wages), but about eight out of 10 respondents in each country are happy with their co-workers.

"The data indicates that with the strengthening of the labor market after the worldwide financial crisis, U.S. workers have become unhappy with the life they can afford for their current wages," said Martin Kahanec, Visiting Research Fellow at Harvard University's Labor and Worklife Program and scientific director at Central European Labour Studies Institute. "However, they still are happy with their relationship to their colleagues and supervisors, their working hours and commuting time. The discontent with wages comes with relatively low satisfaction with their jobs, and even life, and this may herald a growing pressure from workers on pay rises, putting companies in a nontrivial dilemma: higher labor costs or less happy employees."

Here's the breakdown by country:

In the United States, wages average $14 per hour at firms of 10 employees or fewer and $30 per hour at firms of 5,000 employees or more.

  • 77.6 percent of survey respondents in the United States are satisfied with their colleagues;
  • 44.6 percent of U.S. survey respondents in the United States are satisfied with their pay.

In the United Kingdom, wages average £9.20 (approximately $14.50 USD) per hour at firms of 10 employees or fewer and £14.10 (approximately $22.30 USD) per hour at firms of 5,000 employees or more.

  • 76.2 percent of survey respondents in the United Kingdom are satisfied with their colleagues;
  • 48.6 percent of U.K. survey respondents in the United Kingdom are satisfied with their pay.

In Spain, wages average €8.10 (approximately $10.10 USD) per hour at firms of 10 employees or fewer and €14.90 (approximately $18.70 USD) per hour at firms of 5,000 employees or more.

  • 79.6 percent of survey respondents in Spain are satisfied with their co-workers;
  • 49.4 percent of survey respondents in Spain are satisfied with their pay.

In Germany, wages average €11.80 (approximately $14.80 USD) per hour at firms of 10 employees or fewer and €23.50 (approximately $29.40 USD) per hour at firms of 5,000 employees or more.

  • 81.4 percent of survey respondents in Germany are satisfied with their colleagues;
  • 56.4 percent of survey respondents in Germany are satisfied with their pay.

"This data shows that there are motivating factors at work that reach beyond financial compensation," says Joanie Courtney, Senior Vice President, Market Development at Monster. "And although wages appear to be on the rise again in the United States, until they return to pre-recession levels, workers are looking for and finding satisfaction in their interpersonal relationships on the job. However, employers need to focus on engaging and retaining these employees because they could be looking for higher compensation or greener pastures."

For the full breakdown, including survey methodology and additional information, read the full press release on this survey.

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