TL;DR: State officials are talking about reopening the state, but some business owners say they can’t open their doors until workers and customers believe it’s safe. And although wearing masks is now recommended, some Philadelphians are upset that not everyone has embraced the directive.

— Allison Steele (@AESteele, health@inquirer.com)

What you need to know:

🛑 The U.S. must triple the number of coronavirus tests conducted each day in order for the nation to safely reopen, according to the Harvard Global Health Institute.

🍷 Some of Pennsylvania’s state-run liquor stores will offer a limited number of phone orders and curbside pickups starting Monday.

💰 The Trump administration and congressional leaders are working on a $400 billion-plus deal to renew funding for a small business loan program that ran out of money.

😷 Pennsylvania residents are required to wear masks in grocery stores and other businesses as of 8 p.m. Sunday.

Local coronavirus cases

📈As of Sunday evening, there are more than 21,500 confirmed cases in the Philadelphia area. Track the spread here.

  • PHILADELPHIA: 9,214 confirmed cases

  • SUBURBAN PA: 7,879 confirmed cases

  • SOUTH JERSEY: 4,455 confirmed cases

Philly businesses shuttered by coronavirus say they can’t reopen until you feel safe leaving your house

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf has laid out a region-by-region plan for getting the state back to work, but many business owners say their reopening plans will depend on the availability of testing and on whether employees and customers are ready. “I don’t know what it’s going to take. ...I can’t see anyone wanting to sit down next to anyone," said Mark Bee, owner of three bars. And even larger employers like Independence Blue Cross said they aren’t rushing to bring workers back into offices: "We’ll want to be sure people are safe,” said Mark S. Stewart of the law firm Ballard Spahr.

Is going out without a mask an act of aggression? Some in Philly take it that way.

The CDC has recommended that everyone wear masks outside, but many people hate how they feel, and some black men say wearing them could cause others to see them as threatening. Those who take the directive seriously say that anyone who forgoes a mask is risking the community’s safety. “It would be individual choice if wearing a mask protected you," one Philadelphia woman said. “But the fact that wearing a mask protects other people puts it in an entirely different realm.”

Helpful resources

You got this: Watch highlights from 'One World: Together at Home’

The Inquirer’s Dan DeLuca wrote about a few of the best performances from Lady Gaga’s “One World: Together at Home” special, including Philly’s The Roots, Taylor Swift and the Rolling Stones.

🏈 Youth-sports officials are using email, texts, cellphone calls and social media to maintain the sense of community and support that’s so important to the children they serve, particularly those who have difficult home lives.

🎥 Chris Hemsworth talked with the Inquirer’s Gary Thompson about his upcoming Netflix movie, Extraction, and about how he’s enjoying life at home with his kids.

💻 A Zoom Bat Mitzvah helped one local family celebrate the occasion from Center City to Israel.

Have a social distancing tip or question to share? Let us know at health@inquirer.com and your input might be featured in a future edition of this newsletter.

What we’re paying attention to

  • There will be no quick return to the lives we once had, experts told the New York Times. But in the longterm, those experts are hopeful the nation will get the virus under control.

  • Dozens of coronavirus antibody tests were never vetted by the FDA, but ended up on the market anyway despite concerns about their accuracy.

  • In spite of warnings, every Western institution was unprepared for the pandemic. That’s why it’s time to rebuild, writes Marc Andreessen of venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz.

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