Good morning, and I hope your Monday is going much better than the Eagles’ Sunday. For the second week in a row, the Eagles, not to mention their fans, are in disbelief after Sunday’s 37-19 loss to the visiting Los Angeles Rams.

Two things should offer slight consolation to the Eagles: They play in an NFC East Division that appears as weak as last year. In addition, the Eagles will host Cincinnati (0-2) on Sunday.

If you like what you’re reading, tell your friends it’s free to sign up here​. I want to know what you think, what we should add, and what you want to read, so send me feedback by email or on Twitter @sjnard.

Marc Narducci (earlybirds@inquirer.com)

Division should keep Eagles in the hunt

Last year, the Eagles won the NFC East with a 9-7 record. It was the only division in the NFL in which a team won it with fewer than 10 wins.

More of the same should happen this year, which means if Carson Wentz can snap out of his two-game funk and the defense can get some critical stops, the Eagles should still contend for the division title.

Just look at the East. Dallas is 1-1 and needed a miracle comeback, which included recovering an onside kick, to defeat a mediocre Atlanta Falcons team, 40-39, at home Sunday. In fairness, though, Dallas played this same Rams team toe-to-toe, losing by 20-17 last week in Week 1 in Los Angeles.

The Cowboys remain the NFC East favorite, but they are already banged up and still must prove they are more consistent than last year’s underachieving, 8-8 team.

Washington, which looked so good in the second half in last week’s 27-17 win over the Eagles, was soundly beaten, 30-15, by an improved and exciting Arizona Cardinals team Sunday.

The New York Giants are 0-2 and, in their next three games, will host San Francisco and travel to the Rams and Dallas. Looks like 0-5 can be a reasonable expectation. New York is averaging just 14.5 points per game. (Then again, the Eagles are averaging only 18).

That doesn’t mean the Eagles shouldn’t be concerned. Wentz has already thrown four interceptions, including one each week that turned the game around. Last season, he had four interceptions in his first 10 games.

“We’re not panicking. The sky is not falling,” Wentz said. “There are some good things we are doing, and we’ll get back on it.”

Most will consider it a break that the Eagles get to host the Bengals next Sunday. It very well could be, but rookie Joe Burrow attempted 61 passes with three touchdown passes and zero interceptions in Thursday’s 35-30 loss to Cleveland.

If he gets protection (and with the Cincinnati O-line, that is a big if), he can be dangerous. Still, the Eagles should beat the Bengals. Then again, that was also said before they faced Washington.

Eagles tight end Dallas Goedert reaches for the football wwhile defended by Rams cornerback Jalen Ramsey during the fourth quarter.
YONG KIM / Staff Photographer
Eagles tight end Dallas Goedert reaches for the football wwhile defended by Rams cornerback Jalen Ramsey during the fourth quarter.

What you need to know about the Eagles

From the mailbag

Question: Aren’t linebackers supposed to make lots of tackles? Is it just me or did they seem to be blocked or away from the play? — David W. Wannop from Facebook

Answer: Thanks for the question, David. As you know, over the years, the Eagles haven’t prioritized linebackers. In this game, the two starters, Nate Gerry and T.J. Edwards, had seven and five tackles, respectively, but they are not big-play performers like so many teams' linebackers. Plus, you saw Gerry have trouble in coverage, especially on the third Tyler Higbee TD reception.

Even in today’s pass-happy NFL, there is still a place for a playmaking linebacker. Just look across at the field at the Rams' Micah Kiser. He was dominant against the Eagles with 16 tackles, one forced fumble and one pass defensed. He was a difference-maker, and the Eagles can only wish they had a linebacker like that.