Good morning, everyone. On Friday, you were introduced to my colleague Ashley Hoffman. You’re going to be hearing a lot more from her starting tomorrow. It’s been a joy to be able to write for you all (almost) every day since last summer (and you’ll still hear from me about once a week). If you ever have any questions about or suggestions for any of The Inquirer’s newsletters, please don’t hesitate to email me at jrosenblat@inquirer.com.

Last month, Philadelphia officials gathered to game out a range of Election Day scenarios. One scenario, in particular, concerned them most, my colleague Chris Brennan reports.

What if in-person voting suggests that President Donald Trump is winning Pennsylvania after the polls close, but the slower mail-ballot counting in Philly flips the tally to Biden days later? Then, what might Trump’s response be?

It’s a recipe for chaos,” Brennan writes. Trump has for months falsely claimed that mail ballots are vulnerable to widespread fraud, leading far fewer Republicans to request mail ballots than Democrats.

During the pandemic, some wealthier school districts have been able to provide technology to children who need it, helping them put remote learning plans to work. Meanwhile, in low-income districts, households couldn’t easily move online when schools suddenly closed.

What that means, according to reporting from my colleagues Melanie Burney and Kristen A. Graham, is that the digital divide and inequities will widen the achievement gap between students in those more well-off districts and their less-affluent counterparts.

What you need to know today

Through your eyes | #OurPhilly

Hopefully, the rain yesterday and today will make way for more of this greenery. Thanks for sharing, @theresa__cannon.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we’ll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout-out!

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Opinions

That this grieving mother was standing in front of a crowd and talking about her pain when her loss was so fresh should put an end to the narrative — used by public officials to justify their own ineffectiveness — that the community isn’t doing its part. — writes columnist Helen Ubiñas about the continued questions Philly’s victims of gun violence have despite politicians' meetings.

What we’re reading

Your Daily Dose of | Ya Fav Trashman

Terrill Haigler, also known as Ya Fav Trashman, has created an Instagram account to ask for hazard pay and PPE for sanitation workers during the coronavirus pandemic. On Saturday, he also hosted a food drive for all front-line workers in Philly even as he was facing a family medical emergency.