Ben Vaughn, who opened the Tin Angel on Nov. 13, 1992, will close the room on Feb. 4, 2017. Tickets will be available soon.

Owner Donal McCoy sold the building that houses both the Tin Angel and downstairs restaurant Serrano earlier this year. McCoy says that this is not the end for the Tin Angel. He plans on taking the name to a bigger location in the new year.

Booker Larry Goldfarb, who has worked the room since the beginning, says that Vaughn reached out to him when the building sale became public. Vaughn, a Camden County native who is now based on the West Coast, is playing the Boot and Saddle this weekend. That show is sold out.

Vaughn is not the only artist to reach out about returning to the Tin Angel. Acts like Grey Eye Glances, Dar Williams, Citizen Cope (he plays four sets over two days), and Marah are returning to pay tribute to the Tin Angel.  

"This is where people start, or it was stepping stone. Amos Lee worked at the Tin Angel, now he plays the Academy of Music. Damien Rice played the Tin Angel and his next Philly date was a sell out at the Tower. We've had Glen Hansard of the Frames. G. Love, Shelby Lynne, people who played bigger rooms usually like to come back here," Goldfarb said about the importance of the Tin Angel.

When Goldfarb start booking the venue in 1992, it was the only such room in the city. The likes of Ani DiFranco, Donovan, Joan Baez (who was recently inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame), Neko Case, Jeff Buckley and Roseanne Cash have all graced the Tin Angel stage.

"But the competition has become stronger and stronger as the years have go by. People say to me that places like Union Transfer or the Fillmore, they don't matter. But people only have a certain amount of money to spend on entertainment. So if they spend $40 on the Fillmore, they can't come to the Tin Angel the next. It's been hard," Goldfarb said.