By Jennifer Wright
SCIENCE LEADERSHIP ACADEMY

I saw a billboard for the Flyers Winter Classic games and told basically everyone I know how much I really wanted to go to one of these games.

Granted, this was three months ago, before I had the pleasure of waiting for SEPTA for 30-some minutes at 6 a.m. for the last week in weather ranging anywhere from 20 to 30 degrees.
It always leaves me wondering if people in cars pity people waiting at bus stops. Indoor hockey games are what I would call "comfortably cold." I'm aware I am at an ice hockey game, but I'm not that one guy who awkwardly leaves his jacket on. At least put the jersey/shirt over jacket. Games inside my house — I won't even get into. All you need to know is that there is a Snuggie involved.

Outdoor games, I presume, would be a whole different story. They'd leave you wondering which cruel weather god had cursed the great sport of hockey and demanded that fingers and toes resemble icicles as payment. I think you could stretch the expression to, "If you can't take the cold, get out of the rink." Either way, it's going to take a lot of hot chocolate to comfort me.
The first Winter Classic game was held in 2008 in Orchard Park, N.Y. It's success has kept the extra-cold tradition living on.

Knowing what I know now about the rink being smack dab in the middle of the Phillies field, can you even see the puck? From the existing seats, the play may look like orange and red miniatures wielding sticks.

I might be forced to stoop as low as doing the thing the "non-fan" watching sports does: Cheer when everyone else does. Honestly, I can barely see the puck on TV as it stands now.
I do know that if I do make it to an outdoor game, it'll be with my "A Christmas Story" snowsuit and my Coke bottle specs on.