Good morning. The Eagles won. About what’s next for the team, here’s a word of perspective and caution.

First: Republican Sen. Pat Toomey got on the phone with us to talk about what he discussed when he got on the phone with President-elect Joe Biden. He’s going to work with Biden. On some things.

Then: Normally, pregnant women aren’t part of vaccine trials, and while they also weren’t included this time, experts say they should consider getting the coronavirus vaccine.

And: The beginning of the end of the pandemic has arrived at our doorsteps. Here’s what makes the vaccination process such a delicate dance.

— Ashley Hoffman (@_ashleyhoffman, morningnewsletter@inquirer.com)

Pat Toomey is ready to work with Joe Biden. A little.

As Pat Toomey prepares for his final hour, he has new influence and a Democrat in the Oval Office. Pat Toomey talked about how he will — and won’t — find common ground with President-elect Joe Biden in a comprehensive interview with politics writer Jonathan Tamari.

Toomey recently told us that Trump’s campaign to overturn the election was unacceptable, a declaration that’s been widely regarded as rare in the Republican Party.

Read on for how he’ll approach COVID-19, trade, and nominees in this must-read interview.

The COVID-19 vaccine wasn’t tested in pregnancy, but experts say it’s still worth considering if you’re expecting

At a time when health-care workers are getting Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine this week, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention committee is recommending that pregnant health-care workers should still be able to get it.

Typically, you won’t find anyone who’s expecting on any vaccine trial list. But researchers say 330,000 health-care workers are going to be pregnant or breastfeeding when everyone in this group of people is first in line for the vaccine. Experts feel very strongly about what should happen here.

Doctors really want expectant moms to consider getting it because pregnant women would be especially vulnerable if they were to get the virus. Not one of the two dozen people who got the vaccine became pregnant during those studies reported any complications. Read on for the details.

Philadelphia hospitals prepare to give COVID-19 vaccines this week. Who will go first?

Know this. The coronavirus vaccine is not the flu shot. Doling out the first scarce doses is a daunting task. From the ultracold freezers to navigating slammed hospitals, here’s everything you need to know about how people are doing the delicate dance that is the vaccination process.

Helpful COVID-19 Resources

What you need to know today

Through your eyes | #OurPhilly

You got to love this view of Race Street Pier. Thanks for sharing, @westofbroad.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we’ll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout-out!

That’s interesting

Opinions

“Snow is embedded in the national consciousness in ways that transcend the practical or logical. For millions of Americans what is most compelling about snow is the complex and enchanting phenomenon itself.” — weather reporter Anthony R. Wood writes about the enchanting marvel of snow. Just consider the magical metamorphosis of 100,000 water droplets and so much more.

  • Columnist Maria Panaritis writes that a gem of a 62-year-old woman is trying to get school supplies to the neediest students of Philly’s suburbs, and she’s doing it out of her garage.

  • Columnist Jenice Armstrong writes that the distrust between Black people and health care that started long ago lingers today for good reason. Now, a new Pew study revealed that Black people appear less inclined to get the COVID-19 vaccine more than any other racial or ethnic group. Here’s how far implicit bias has gone.

What we’re reading

Your Daily Dose of | Music

At the George Floyd memorial service in Minneapolis over the summer, it was gospel musician Darnell Davis who stepped forward to play. His new album with his group, Darnell Davis & the Remnant, weaves a lattice of traditional gospel sounds to explore themes of trust, self-love, and community. It’s “just what the doctor ordered” for the time we’re living through right now. Here’s how he’s keeping his spirits high.